Appl Clin Inform 2018; 09(02): 411-421
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1654700
Research Article
Schattauer

Semiautomated System for Nonurgent, Clinically Significant Pathology Results

Stacy D. O'Connor
1  Center for Evidence-Based Imaging and Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
,
Ramin Khorasani
1  Center for Evidence-Based Imaging and Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
,
Stephen M. Pochebit
2  Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Faulkner Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
,
Ronilda Lacson
1  Center for Evidence-Based Imaging and Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
,
Katherine P. Andriole
1  Center for Evidence-Based Imaging and Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
,
Anuj K. Dalal
3  Department of Internal Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
› Author Affiliations
Funding This work was partially supported by grants from the Controlled Risk Insurance Company Risk Management Foundation and the Boston Area Research Training Program in Biomedical Informatics (National Library of Medicine (NLM) grant T15LM007092).
Further Information

Publication History

16 November 2017

13 April 2018

Publication Date:
06 June 2018 (online)

Abstract

Background Failure of timely test result follow-up has consequences including delayed diagnosis and treatment, added costs, and potential patient harm. Closed-loop communication is key to ensure clinically significant test results (CSTRs) are acknowledged and acted upon appropriately. A previous implementation of the Alert Notification of Critical Results (ANCR) system to facilitate closed-loop communication of imaging CSTRs yielded improved communication of critical radiology results and enhanced adherence to institutional CSTR policies.

Objective This article extends the ANCR application to pathology and evaluates its impact on closed-loop communication of new malignancies, a common and important type of pathology CSTR.

Materials and Methods This Institutional Review Board-approved study was performed at a 150-bed community, academically affiliated hospital. ANCR was adapted for pathology CSTRs. Natural language processing was used on 30,774 pathology reports 13 months pre- and 13 months postintervention, identifying 5,595 reports with malignancies. Electronic health records were reviewed for documented acknowledgment for a random sample of reports. Percent of reports with documented acknowledgment within 15 days assessed institutional policy adherence. Time to acknowledgment was compared pre- versus postintervention and postintervention with and without ANCR alerts. Pathologists were surveyed regarding ANCR use and satisfaction.

Results Acknowledgment within 15 days was documented for 98 of 107 (91.6%) pre- and 89 of 103 (86.4%) postintervention reports (p = 0.2294). Median time to acknowledgment was 7 days (interquartile range [IQR], 3, 11) preintervention and 6 days (IQR, 2, 10) postintervention (p = 0.5083). Postintervention, median time to acknowledgment was 2 days (IQR, 1, 6) for reports with ANCR alerts versus 6 days (IQR, 2.75, 9) for reports without alerts (p = 0.0351). ANCR alerts were sent on 15 of 103 (15%) postintervention reports. All pathologists reported that the ANCR system positively impacted their workflow; 75% (three-fourths) felt that the ANCR system improved efficiency of communicating CSTRs.

Conclusion ANCR expansion to facilitate closed-loop communication of pathology CSTRs was favorably perceived and associated with significant improved time to documented acknowledgment for new malignancies. The rate of adherence to institutional policy did not improve.

Protection of Human and Animal Subjects

The study was performed in compliance with the World Medical Association Declaration of Helsinki on Ethical Principles for Medical Research Involving Human Subjects, and was reviewed by the Brigham and Women's Institutional Review Board.