Appl Clin Inform 2016; 07(02): 430-445
DOI: 10.4338/ACI-2015-12-RA-0170
Research Article
Schattauer GmbH

Acceptance and Use of Mobile Technology for Health Self-Monitoring in Lung Transplant Recipients during the First Year Post-Transplantation

Yun Jiang
1  University of Michigan School of Nursing, 400 N Ingalls St., Ann Arbor, MI
,
Susan M. Sereika
2  University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, 3500 Victoria St., Pittsburgh, PA
,
Annette DeVito Dabbs
2  University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, 3500 Victoria St., Pittsburgh, PA
,
Steven M. Handler
3  University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, M-172 200 Meyran Ave, Pittsburgh, PA
,
Elizabeth A. Schlenk
2  University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, 3500 Victoria St., Pittsburgh, PA
› Author Affiliations
The study was supported through funding from the Greater Pittsburgh Nursing Research Conference Nursing Research Grant and the Pauline Thompson Clinical Nursing Research Award from the Nursing Foundation of Pennsylvania.
Further Information

Correspondence to:

Yun Jiang, PhD, MS, RN
Department of Systems
Populations and Leadership
School of Nursing University of Michigan
400 N Ingalls
Ann Arbor
MI 48109
United States
Phone: +1 734 763 3705   

Publication History

received: 07 December 2015

accepted: 12 March 2016

Publication Date:
16 December 2017 (online)

 

Summary

Objectives

To describe lung transplant recipients (LTRs’) acceptance and use of mobile technology for health self-monitoring during the first year post-transplantation, and explore correlates of the use of technology in the 0 to 2, >2 to ≤6, >6 to ≤12, and 0 to 12 months.

Methods

Secondary analysis of data from 96 LTR assigned to use Pocket PATH®, a smartphone application, for daily health self-monitoring in a randomized controlled trial. Use of Pocket PATH was categorized as low, moderate, and high use. Proportional odds models for ordinal logistic regression were employed to explore correlates of use of technology.

Results

LTR reported high acceptance of Pocket PATH at baseline. However, acceptance was not associated with actual use over the 12 months (p=0.45∼0.96). Actual use decreased across time intervals (p<0.001). Increased self-care agency was associated with the increased odds of higher use in women (p=0.03) and those less satisfied with technology training (p=0.02) in the first 2 months. Higher use from >2 to ≤6 months was associated with greater satisfaction with technology training (OR=3.37, p=0.01) and shorter length of hospital stay (OR=0.98, p=0.02). Higher use from >6 to ≤12 months was associated with older age (OR=1.05, p=0.02), lower psychological distress (OR=0.43, p=0.02), and better physical functioning (OR=1.09, p=0.01). Higher use over 12 months was also associated with older age (OR=1.05, p=0.007), better physical functioning (OR=1.13, p=0.001), and greater satisfaction with technology training (OR=3.05, p=0.02).

Conclusions

Correlates were different for short- and long-term use of mobile technology for health self-monitoring in the first year post-transplantation. It is important to follow up with LTR with longer hospital stay, poor physical functioning, and psychological distress, providing ongoing education to improve their long-term use of technology for health self-monitoring.

Citation: Jiang Y, Sereika SM, DeVito Dabbs A, Handler SM, Schlenk EA. Acceptance and use of mobile technology for health self-monitoring in lung transplant recipients during the first year post-transplantation.


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Conflicts of Interest

All authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest in the research.


Correspondence to:

Yun Jiang, PhD, MS, RN
Department of Systems
Populations and Leadership
School of Nursing University of Michigan
400 N Ingalls
Ann Arbor
MI 48109
United States
Phone: +1 734 763 3705