Appl Clin Inform 2016; 07(03): 777-789
DOI: 10.4338/ACI-2015-11-RA-0151
Research Article
Schattauer GmbH

Perfect Storm of Inpatient Communication Needs and an Innovative Solution Utilizing Smartphones and Secured Messaging

Neha Patel
1  Perelman School of Medicine, the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
,
James E. Siegler
2  Department of Neurology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
,
Nathaniel Stromberg
3  Center for Clinical Effectiveness & Quality Improvement, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
,
Neil Ravitz
4  Presbyterian Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
,
C. William Hanson
5  Department of Anesthesia, and Chief Medical Informatics Officer, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
› Institutsangaben
Weitere Informationen

Correspondence to:

Neha Patel, MD, MS
3400 Spruce Street
5020 Maloney
Philadelphia
PA 19104
Fax: 215-662-6250   
Telefon: 215-847-9916

Publikationsverlauf

received: 14. November 2015

accepted: 27. März 2016

Publikationsdatum:
19. Dezember 2017 (online)

 

Summary

Background

In hospitals, effective and efficient communication among care providers is critical to the provision of high-quality patient care. Yet, major problems impede communications including the frequent use of interruptive and one-way communication paradigms. This is especially frustrating for frontline providers given the dynamic nature of hospital care teams in an environment that is in constant flux.

Methods

We conducted a pre-post evaluation of a commercially available secured messaging mobile application on 4 hospital units at a single institution for over one year. We included care providers on these units: residents, hospitalists, fellows, nurses, social workers, and pharmacists. Utilization metrics and survey responses on clinician perceptions were collected and analyzed using descriptive statistics, the Kruskal-Wallis test, and Mann-Whitney U test where appropriate.

Results

Between May 2013 and June 2014, 1,021 providers sent a total of 708,456 messages. About 85.5% of total threads were between two providers and the remaining were group messages. Residents and social workers/clinical resource coordinators were the largest per person users of this communication system, sending 9 (IQR 2–20) and 9 (IQR 2–22) messages per person per day, and receiving 18 (IQR 5–36) and 14 (IQR 5–29) messages per person per day, respectively (p=0.0001). More than half of the messages received by hospitalists, residents, and nurses were read within a minute. Communicating using secured messaging was found to be statistically significantly less disruptive to workflow by both nursing and physician survey respondents (p<0.001 for each comparison).

Conclusions

Routine adoption of secured messaging improved perceived efficiency among providers on 4 hospital units. Our study suggests that a mobile application can improve communication and workflow efficiency among providers in a hospital. New technology has the potential to improve communication among care providers in hospitals.

Citation: Patel N, Siegler JE, Stromberg N, Ravitz N, Hanson CW. Perfect storm of inpatient communication needs and an innovative solution utilizing smartphones and secured messaging.


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Conflict of Interest

The authors report no competing financial interests exist, including financial compensation from Cureatr for the use of its system. The views and opinions expressed herein do not reflect those of Cureatr or its affiliates, and no Cureatr official has contributed to the conceptualization or content of this manuscript. The authors report no conflict of interests in the research.


Correspondence to:

Neha Patel, MD, MS
3400 Spruce Street
5020 Maloney
Philadelphia
PA 19104
Fax: 215-662-6250   
Telefon: 215-847-9916