Appl Clin Inform 2014; 05(02): 589-593
DOI: 10.4338/ACI-2013-12-IE-0099
Invited Editorial
Schattauer GmbH

Death, Taxes and Advance Directives

N.M. Wood
1  University of Texas School of Public Health, Houston, Texas, United States
,
J.D. D‘Amore
2  Diameter Health, Newton, Massachusetts, United States
,
S.L. Jones
3  Houston Methodist Hospital, Surgery, Houston, Texas, United States
,
D.F. Sittig
4  University of Texas School of Biomedical Informatics and the UT-Memorial Hermann Center for Healthcare Quality & Safety, Houston, Texas
,
R.B. Ness
1  University of Texas School of Public Health, Houston, Texas, United States
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Correspondence to:

Nancy M. Wood
University of Texas School of Public Health
7000 S. Fannin Street
Suite 2672C
Houston, TX 77030 USA

Publication History

Received: 10 March 2014

Accepted: 08 May 2014

Publication Date:
21 December 2017 (online)

 

Summary

Suboptimal care at the end-of-life can be due to lack of access or knowledge of patient wishes. Ambiguity is often the result of non-standardized formats. Borrowing digital technology from other industries and using existing health information infrastructure can greatly improve the completion, storage, and distribution of advance directives. We believe several simple, low-cost adaptations to regional and federal programs can raise the standard of end-of-life care.

Citation: Wood NM, D’Amore JD, Jones SL, Sittig DF, Ness RB. Death, taxes and advance directives. Appl Clin Inf 2014; 5: 589–593 http://dx.doi.org/10.4338/ACI-2013-12-IE-0099


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Conflicts of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest in the research.


Correspondence to:

Nancy M. Wood
University of Texas School of Public Health
7000 S. Fannin Street
Suite 2672C
Houston, TX 77030 USA