Appl Clin Inform 2013; 04(02): 201-211
DOI: 10.4338/ACI-2013-01-R-0007
Review
Schattauer GmbH

Medical Student Appraisal

Applications For Bedside Patient Education
T.M. Markman
1  Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
,
P.J. Sampognaro
1  Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
,
S.L. Mitchell
1  Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
,
S.R. Weeks
1  Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
,
S. Khalifian
1  Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
,
J.R. Dattilo
1  Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Correspondence to:

Jonathan Dattilo
Doctors’ Lounge, 110 Harvey/Nelson Building
Johns Hopkins Hospital
600 N. Wolfe Street
Baltimore, MD 21287

Publication History

received: 02 February 2013

accepted: 08 April 2013

Publication Date:
19 December 2017 (online)

 

Summary

Background: Medical students are often afforded the privilege of counselling patients. In the past resources were limited to pen and paper or anatomic models. The evolution of mobile applications allows for limitless access to resources that facilitate bedside patient education.

Objectives: To evaluate the utility of six applications in patient education and promote awareness of implementing mobile resources in clinical care.

Methods: Six medical students rotating on various clerkships evaluated a total of six mobile applications. Strengths, limitations, and suggested uses in clinical care were identified. Applications included MeditoonsTM, VisiblePatientTM, DrawMDTM, CardioTeachTM, Visual AnatomyTM, and 360° Patient Education SuiteTM. Data was generated from narrative responses supplied by each student during their evaluation period.

Results: Bedside teaching was enhanced by professional illustrations and animations depicting anatomy and pathophysiology. Impromptu teaching was facilitated, as resources were conveniently available on a student’s smartphone or tablet. The ability to annotate and modify images and subsequently email to patients was an extraordinary improvement in provider-patient communication. Universal limitations included small smartphone screens and the novelty of new technology.

Discussion: Mobile applications have the potential to greatly enhance patient education and simultaneously build rapport. Endless opportunities exist for their integration in clinical practice, particularly for new diagnoses, consent for procedures, and at time of discharge. Providers should be encouraged to try new applications and utilize them with patients.

Citation: Markman TM, Sampognaro PJ, Mitchell SL, Weeks SR, Khalifian S, Dattilo JR. Medical student appraisal: Applications for bedside patient education. Appl Clin Inf 2013; 4: 201–211

http://dx.doi.org/10.4338/ACI-2013-01-R-0007


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Conflicts Of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest in this research.


Correspondence to:

Jonathan Dattilo
Doctors’ Lounge, 110 Harvey/Nelson Building
Johns Hopkins Hospital
600 N. Wolfe Street
Baltimore, MD 21287