Appl Clin Inform 2011; 02(02): 240-249
DOI: 10.4338/ACI-2011-02-RA-0016
Research Article
Schattauer GmbH

The Role of Nonverbal and Verbal Communication in a Multimedia Informed Consent Process

Joseph M. Plasek
1  Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation, Marshfield, Wisc. USA
2  University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn., USA
,
David S. Pieczkiewicz
1  Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation, Marshfield, Wisc. USA
2  University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn., USA
,
Andrea N. Mahnke
1  Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation, Marshfield, Wisc. USA
,
Catherine A. McCarty
1  Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation, Marshfield, Wisc. USA
,
Justin B. Starren
1  Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation, Marshfield, Wisc. USA
,
Bonnie L. Westra
2  University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn., USA
› Author Affiliations
This study was grant funded by NIH National Human Genome Research Institute as a part of the eMERGE project, grant number 5 U01 U01HG04608. The authors would like to thank Wendy Foth, the primary research coordinator for PMRP at the Marshfield Clinic for participating in the study. The authors would also like to thank the Marshfield Clinic staffs who were involved with the larger study objectives: Valerie D. McManus, Carol J. Waudby, Joe Ellefson, Dave G. Hoffman, Nancy Stueland-Adamski. The authors would also like to thank the four anonymous reviewers for their comments.
Further Information

Publication History

Received: 16 February 2011

Accepted: 05 May 2011

Publication Date:
16 December 2017 (online)

Summary

Objective: Nonverbal and verbal communication elements enhance and reinforce the consent form in the informed consent process and need to be transferred appropriately to multimedia formats using interaction design when re-designing the process.

Methods: Observational, question asking behavior, and content analyses were used to analyze nonverbal and verbal elements of an informed consent process.

Results: A variety of gestures, interruptions, and communication styles were observed. Conclusion: In converting a verbal conversation about a textual document to multimedia formats, all aspects of the original process including verbal and nonverbal variation should be one part of an interaction community-centered design approach.