Appl Clin Inform 2010; 01(01): 19-31
DOI: 10.4338/ACI-2009-10-RA-0004
Research Article
Schattauer GmbH

Computerized Provider Order Entry with Pager Notification Improves Efficiency in STAT Radiographic Studies and Respiratory Treatments

Brian R. Jacobs MD
1  Center for Pediatric Informatics, Children’s National Medical Center, Washington DC
,
Eric Crotty MD
2  Department of Radiology and Divisions of Respiratory Therapy and Critical Care Medicine, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio
,
Conway RRT
3  Divisions of Respiratory Therapy and Critical Care Medicine, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio
,
Kim Ward Hart
4  Critical Care Medicine, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio
,
Craig Dietrich
4  Critical Care Medicine, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio
,
Scott Pettinichi RRT
3  Divisions of Respiratory Therapy and Critical Care Medicine, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio
,
John Racadio MD
2  Department of Radiology and Divisions of Respiratory Therapy and Critical Care Medicine, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

received: 20 October 2009

accepted after major revision: 02 February 2010

Publication Date:
16 December 2017 (online)

Summary

Background: The use of computerized provider order entry (CPOE) has been widely linked to improvements in patient safety. We hypothesized that electronic routing of CPOE-generated orders through individual pagers would improve the efficiency of STAT radiographic studies and respiratory treatments.

Methods: The study was conducted in two periods before and after implementing pager notification of STAT orders. In the Baseline Period, CPOE-generated STAT orders were communicated to radiology technicians or respiratory therapists through the use of printed orders, manual paging and/or telephone communication. The time to process the order and deliver a radiology result or respiratory treatment was tracked. In the Intervention Period CPOE-generated STAT orders were electronically routed to the radiology technician’s or respiratory therapist’s pager. During both time periods, clinicians completed user satisfaction surveys.

Results: Using pager notification, there was a significant reduction in radiology technician arrival time (16.8±2.1 vs 7.9±0.7 mins, p<0.001). Similarly there was a significant reduction in the cumulative time required to capture the radiographic image, image availability in the picture archiving and communication system (PACS) and the verbal report from the radiologist (p<0.05). The time required in obtaining a preliminary or final radiographic written report and the total cycle times were not significantly reduced. For STAT respiratory therapy orders there was a significant reduction in the mean time from ordering to administration of respiratory therapy treatments (124.7±14.1 vs 49.8±11.4 minutes, p<0.01). Radiologists, respiratory therapists and ordering clinicians reported improved satisfaction after implementation of pager notification.

Conclusion: Computer-generated orders for STAT radiographic studies and respiratory treatments can be carried out significantly faster through the use of direct pager notification. The implementation of this process has resulted in improved care delivery and widespread clinician satisfaction.