Appl Clin Inform 2021; 12(01): 010-016
DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1721012
Research Article

Coronary Artery Disease Phenotype Detection in an Academic Hospital System Setting

Amy Joseph
1  Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, United States
,
Charles Mullett
1  Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, United States
2  West Virginia Clinical and Translational Science Institute, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, United States
,
Christa Lilly
3  Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, United States
,
Matthew Armistead
2  West Virginia Clinical and Translational Science Institute, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, United States
,
Harold J. Cox
2  West Virginia Clinical and Translational Science Institute, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, United States
,
Michael Denney
2  West Virginia Clinical and Translational Science Institute, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, United States
,
Misha Varma
1  Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, United States
,
David Rich
4  West Virginia University Hospital System, Morgantown, West Virginia, United States
,
Donald A. Adjeroh
5  Lane Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, Benjamin M. Statler College of Engineering and Mineral Resources, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, United States
,
Gianfranco Doretto
5  Lane Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, Benjamin M. Statler College of Engineering and Mineral Resources, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, United States
,
William Neal
1  Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, United States
,
Lee A. Pyles
1  Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, United States
› Author Affiliations
Funding The project described was supported by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, 2U54GM104942–02 and in part by funds from the National Science Foundation (NSF: # 1920920). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Abstract

Background The United States, and especially West Virginia, have a tremendous burden of coronary artery disease (CAD). Undiagnosed familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an important factor for CAD in the U.S. Identification of a CAD phenotype is an initial step to find families with FH.

Objective We hypothesized that a CAD phenotype detection algorithm that uses discrete data elements from electronic health records (EHRs) can be validated from EHR information housed in a data repository.

Methods We developed an algorithm to detect a CAD phenotype which searched through discrete data elements, such as diagnosis, problem lists, medical history, billing, and procedure (International Classification of Diseases [ICD]-9/10 and Current Procedural Terminology [CPT]) codes. The algorithm was applied to two cohorts of 500 patients, each with varying characteristics. The second (younger) cohort consisted of parents from a school child screening program. We then determined which patients had CAD by systematic, blinded review of EHRs. Following this, we revised the algorithm by refining the acceptable diagnoses and procedures. We ran the second algorithm on the same cohorts and determined the accuracy of the modification.

Results CAD phenotype Algorithm I was 89.6% accurate, 94.6% sensitive, and 85.6% specific for group 1. After revising the algorithm (denoted CAD Algorithm II) and applying it to the same groups 1 and 2, sensitivity 98.2%, specificity 87.8%, and accuracy 92.4; accuracy 93% for group 2. Group 1 F1 score was 92.4%. Specific ICD-10 and CPT codes such as “coronary angiography through a vein graft” were more useful than generic terms.

Conclusion We have created an algorithm, CAD Algorithm II, that detects CAD on a large scale with high accuracy and sensitivity (recall). It has proven useful among varied patient populations. Use of this algorithm can extend to monitor a registry of patients in an EHR and/or to identify a group such as those with likely FH.

Protection of Human and Animal Subjects

This study was performed in compliance with the World Medical Association Declaration of Helsinki on Ethical Principles for Medical Research Involving Human Subjects and was reviewed by the West Virginia University Institutional Review Board.


Supplementary Material



Publication History

Received: 26 May 2020

Accepted: 09 October 2020

Publication Date:
06 January 2021 (online)

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