Appl Clin Inform 2020; 11(03): 474-482
DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1713750
Research Article
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Feasibility and Reliability Testing of Manual Electronic Health Record Reviews as a Tool for Timely Identification of Diagnostic Error in Patients at Risk

Jalal Soleimani
1  Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, United States
,
Yuliya Pinevich
1  Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, United States
,
Amelia K. Barwise
2  Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, United States
,
Chanyan Huang
1  Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, United States
3  Department of Anesthesiology, the First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China
,
Yue Dong
1  Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, United States
,
Vitaly Herasevich
1  Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, United States
,
Ognjen Gajic
2  Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, United States
,
Brian W. Pickering
1  Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, United States
› Institutsangaben
Funding This work was supported by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (grant number R18HS026609, received by Dr. Brian W. Pickering) and the Society of Critical Care Medicine 2019 SCCM Discovery Grant Award (received by Dr. Amelia K. Barwise).
Weitere Informationen

Publikationsverlauf

24. März 2020

24. Mai 2020

Publikationsdatum:
15. Juli 2020 (online)

Abstract

Background Although diagnostic error (DE) is a significant problem, it remains challenging for clinicians to identify it reliably and to recognize its contribution to the clinical trajectory of their patients. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the reliability of real-time electronic health record (EHR) reviews using a search strategy for the identification of DE as a contributor to the rapid response team (RRT) activation.

Objectives Early and accurate recognition of critical illness is of paramount importance. The objective of this study was to test the feasibility and reliability of prospective, real-time EHR reviews as a means of identification of DE.

Methods We conducted this prospective observational study in June 2019 and included consecutive adult patients experiencing their first RRT activation. An EHR search strategy and a standard operating procedure were refined based on the literature and expert clinician inputs. Two physician-investigators independently reviewed eligible patient EHRs for the evidence of DE within 24 hours after RRT activation. In cases of disagreement, a secondary review of the EHR using a taxonomy approach was applied. The reviewers categorized patient experience of DE as Yes/No/Uncertain.

Results We reviewed 112 patient records. DE was identified in 15% of cases by both reviewers. Kappa agreement with the initial review was 0.23 and with the secondary review 0.65. No evidence of DE was detected in 60% of patients. In 25% of cases, the reviewers could not determine whether DE was present or absent.

Conclusion EHR review is of limited value in the real-time identification of DE in hospitalized patients. Alternative approaches are needed for research and quality improvement efforts in this field.

Protection of Human and Animal Subjects

The study was performed in compliance with the World Medical Association Declaration of Helsinki on Ethical Principles for Medical Research Involving Human Subjects and was reviewed by Mayo Clinic Institutional Review Board.


Note

This work was performed at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, United States. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality or the Society of Critical Care Medicine.