Appl Clin Inform 2019; 10(05): 804-809
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1697599
Research Article
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

A Comparison of One- and Four-Open-Chart Access: No Change in Computerized Provider Order Entry Error Rates

Paula Scariati
1  Health Informatics, Dignity Health, San Francisco, California, United States
,
Herschel Knapp
2  Nursing Research & Analytics, Dignity Health, Phoenix, Arizona, United States
,
Stuart Gray
2  Nursing Research & Analytics, Dignity Health, Phoenix, Arizona, United States
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

01 March 2019

09 August 2019

Publication Date:
23 October 2019 (online)

Abstract

Objective To assess changes in computerized provider order entry error rates among providers who with less than 24-hour notice were switched from four-chart access to one-chart-only access.

Methods An interrupted time series analysis of emergency medicine providers, hospitalists, and maternal child health providers was performed with pairwise comparison of computerized provider order entry error rates within and between specialties. This retrospective snapshot consisted of four phases. Phase 1 was the baseline 2 weeks where providers were privileged to work with up to four charts open. Phase 2 was the 2-week period where providers were limited to one-chart access. Phase 3 was the 2-week period where providers were returned to four-chart access. And phase 4 was a 2-week period 3 months following the end of phase 3.

Results Analysis of the overall and specialty-stratified cohorts revealed no statistically significant differences in median computerized provider order entry error rates across the four phases (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, α = 0.05). However, statistically significant differences in median computerized provider order entry error rates were detected between the three specialties within each phase of the study (Kruskal–Wallis, p < 0.001).

Conclusion Allowing providers in select specialties to have access to four charts simultaneously does not increase their computerized provider order entry error rates. Significant differences in error rates between specialties suggest the need for further study of the use of standardized order sets, charting, and workflow variations.

Protection of Human and Animal Subjects

This study was submitted to the Dignity Health Research Integrity Office (eIRB) and deemed a continuous quality improvement project sponsored by Dignity Health conducted by Health Informatics. As such, it was exempt from IRB review.