Appl Clin Inform 2019; 10(04): 634-642
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1694965
Research Article
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Evaluation of a Training Program to Improve Organizational Capacity for Health Systems Analytics

Steven D. Miller
1  Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
,
Phillip Stablein
2  Casemix Information Management, Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
,
Jay Syed
3  Technology Innovation Center, Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
,
Valerie Smothers
4  Department of Emerging Technologies, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
,
Emily Marx
3  Technology Innovation Center, Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
,
Peter Greene
5  Department of Cardiac Surgery, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
,
Harold Lehmann
6  Department of Health Science Informatics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
,
Paul G. Nagy
7  Department of Radiology, Technology Innovation Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
› Author Affiliations
Funding None.
Further Information

Publication History

19 April 2019

06 July 2019

Publication Date:
28 August 2019 (online)

Abstract

Objective The Leadership in Analytics and Data Science (LEADS) course was evaluated for effectiveness. LEADS was a 6-month program for working biomedical and health informatics (BMHI) professionals designed to improve analytics skills, knowledge of enterprise applications, data stewardship, and to foster an analytics community of practice through lectures, hands-on skill building workshops, networking events, and small group projects.

Methods The effectiveness of the LEADS course was evaluated using the Kirkpatrick Model by assessing pre- and postcourse knowledge, analytics capabilities, goals, practice, class lecture reaction, and change in the size of participant professional networks. Differences in pre- and postcourse responses were analyzed with a Wilcoxon signed rank test to determine significance, and effect sizes were computed using a z-statistic.

Results Twenty-nine students completed the course with 96% of respondents reporting that they were “very” or “extremely” likely to recommend the course. Participants reported improvement in several analytics capabilities including Epic data warehousing (p = 0.017), institutional review board policy (p = 0.005), and data stewardship (p = 0.007). Changes in practice patterns mirrored those in self-reported capability. On average, the participant professional network doubled.

Conclusion LEADS was the first course targeted to working BMHI professional at a large academic medical center to have a formal effectiveness evaluation be published in the literature. The course achieved the goals of expansion of BMHI knowledge, skills, and professional networks. The LEADS course provides a template for continuing education of working BMHI professionals.

Protection of Human and Animal Subjects

This study was performed in compliance with the World Medical Association Declaration of Helsinki on Ethical Principles for Medical Research Involving Human Subjects, and was reviewed by the JHM Institutional Review Board.


Supplementary Material