Appl Clin Inform 2018; 09(04): 884-891
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1676041
Review Article
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Health Information Exchange in Emergency Medical Services

Thomas J. Martin
1  The Warren Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, United States
2  Brown University EMS, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, United States
,
Megan L. Ranney
1  The Warren Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, United States
3  Department of Emergency Medicine, The Warren Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, United States
,
James Dorroh
2  Brown University EMS, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, United States
,
Nicholas Asselin
1  The Warren Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, United States
3  Department of Emergency Medicine, The Warren Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, United States
,
Indra Neil Sarkar
1  The Warren Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, United States
4  Center for Biomedical Informatics, The Warren Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, United States
› Author Affiliations
Funding This work was funded in part by National Institutes of Health grant U54GM115677 and K23MH095866. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.
Further Information

Publication History

28 August 2018

16 October 2018

Publication Date:
12 December 2018 (online)

Abstract

Background The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology has outlined the benefits of health information exchange in emergency medical services (EMSs) according to the SAFR model—search, alert, file, and reconcile—developed in collaboration with the California Emergency Medical Services Authority.

Objective This scoping review aims to identify and characterize progress toward the adoption of prehospital health information exchange, as reported in the peer-reviewed literature.

Methods A structured review of literature in MEDLINE-indexed journals was conducted using the “Electronic Health Records” topic-specific query, the “Emergency Medical Services” Medical Subject Headings descriptor, and a prehospital identifier.

Results Our initial search yielded 368 nonduplicative, English-language articles; 131 articles underwent full-text review and 11 were selected for analysis according to pre-established inclusion criteria. Original research was thematically grouped according to the SAFR model.

Conclusion Within isolated systems, there has been limited progress toward the adoption of prehospital health information exchange. Interoperability, accurate match algorithms, security, and wireless connectivity have been identified as potential barriers to adoption. Additional research is required to evaluate the role of health information exchange within EMSs.

Protection of Human and Animal Subjects

There were no human or animal subjects included in this review.