Appl Clin Inform 2018; 09(03): 565-575
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1667041
Research Article
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Leveraging Patient-Reported Outcomes Using Data Visualization

Lisa V. Grossman
Department of Biomedical Informatics, Columbia University, New York, New York, United States
College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, New York, United States
,
Steven K. Feiner
Department of Computer Science, Columbia University, New York, New York, United States
,
Elliot G. Mitchell
Department of Biomedical Informatics, Columbia University, New York, New York, United States
,
Ruth M. Masterson Creber
School of Nursing, Columbia University, New York, New York, United States
› Author Affiliations
Funding This study is supported by the National Institute of Nursing Research (K99NR016275, PI: Masterson Creber).
Further Information

Publication History

21 March 2018

04 June 2018

Publication Date:
01 August 2018 (online)

Abstract

Background Health care organizations increasingly use patient-reported outcomes (PROs) to capture patients' health status. Although federal policy mandates PRO collection, the challenge remains to better engage patients in PRO surveys, and ensure patients comprehend the surveys and their results.

Objective This article identifies the design requirements for an interface that assists patients with PRO survey completion and interpretation, and then builds and evaluates the interface.

Methods We employed a user-centered design process that consisted of three stages. First, we conducted qualitative interviews and surveys with 13 patients and 11 health care providers to understand their perceptions of the value and challenges associated with the use of PRO measures. Second, we used the results to identify design requirements for an interface that collects PROs, and designed the interface. Third, we conducted usability testing with 12 additional patients in a hospital setting.

Results In interviews, patients and providers reported that PRO surveys help patients to reflect on their symptoms, potentially identifying new opportunities for improved care. However, 6 out of 13 patients reported significant difficultly in understanding PRO survey questions, answer choices and results. Therefore, we identified aiding comprehension as a key design requirement, and incorporated visualizations into our interface design to aid comprehension. In usability testing, patients found the interface highly usable.

Conclusion Future interfaces designed to collect PROs may benefit from employing strategies such as visualization to aid comprehension and engage patients with surveys.

Protection of Human and Animal Subjects

The study was performed in compliance with the World Medical Association Declaration of Helsinki on Ethical Principles for Medical Research Involving Human Subjects, and was reviewed by the Columbia University Medical Center Institutional Review Board.