Thorac cardiovasc Surg 2014; 62(07): 612-615
DOI: 10.1055/s-0034-1377060
Original Thoracic
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Surgery of Primary Lung Cancer with Oligometastatic M1b Synchronous Single Brain Metastasis: Analysis of 37 Cases

Danjouma Housmanou Cheufou
1  Department of Thoracic Surgery and Endoscopy, Ruhrlandklinik, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany
,
Stefan Welter
1  Department of Thoracic Surgery and Endoscopy, Ruhrlandklinik, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany
,
Eleftherios Chalvatzoulis
1  Department of Thoracic Surgery and Endoscopy, Ruhrlandklinik, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany
,
Daniel Christof
2  Department of Medical Oncology, West German Cancer Center, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany
,
Dirk Theegarten
3  Institut of Pathology and Neuropathology, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany
,
Georgios Stamatis
1  Department of Thoracic Surgery and Endoscopy, Ruhrlandklinik, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

02 December 2013

01 April 2014

Publication Date:
19 August 2014 (online)

Abstract

Background At the time of diagnosis, lung cancer has often metastasized already. Brain metastases, however, are associated with a poor prognosis (median survival of less than 1 year). We evaluated the changes of the median survival after resection of the cerebral metastases and primary non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Materials and Methods Between January 1999 and December 2009, 37 patients (22 men, 15 women; median age: 55.64 years; age range: 38–72 years) underwent surgery for primary NSCLC after craniotomy and removal of the synchronous single brain metastasis. The overall survival was evaluated and risk factors identified.

Results Mediastinal lymph node involvement was excluded with mediastinoscopy in 26 of the 37 patients. Postoperative N-stage was N0, N1, and N2 in 16 (43%), 10 (27%), and 11 (30%) patients, respectively. Histology was squamous cell carcinoma in 10 (27%), adenocarcinoma in 20 (54%), and large cell carcinoma in 7 (19%). The employed type of resection was anatomical segmentectomy in 6 and lobectomy in 31 patients. The 30-day mortality was 0% and postoperative complications occurred in 12 patients only (32%). The overall 1 and 2 years survival were 62 and 24%, respectively. None of the factors age, sex, tumor histology, primary location of the tumor, type of resection, adjuvant chemotherapy, or nodal status affected survival in the univariate analysis.

Conclusions The oncologic lung resection of NSCLC after the resection of a single brain metastasis can be implemented without an increased risk of complications or mortality. Despite the stage IV disease, the median survival appears encouraging.