Eur J Pediatr Surg 2018; 28(01): 105-108
DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1618589
Original Article
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Using Tissue Expanders as a Choice for the Treatment of Congenital Facial Nevus in the Young Child

Martha Isabel Romo Muñoz
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain
,
Alba Sánchez Galán
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain
,
Miriam Miguel
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain
,
Vanesa Nuñez Cerezo
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain
,
Bryant Noriega Rebolledo
2  Department of Anesthesia, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain
,
Mariela Dore
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain
,
Paloma Triana Junco
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain
,
Saturnino Barrena
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain
,
Mercedes Diaz
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain
,
Juan Carlos Lopez-Gutierrez
3  Division of Vascular Anomalies, Department of Pediatric Surgery, La Paz Children's Hospital, Madrid, Spain
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

19 April 2017

18 December 2017

Publication Date:
02 January 2018 (eFirst)

Abstract

Objective One of the principal objectives in treatment of facial nevus is to minimize psychological damage and encourage the child's schooling by the best possible cosmetic result. There are several therapeutic techniques: grafts, flaps, dermal regenerator, and tissue expanders.

Materials and Methods We reviewed 10 patients with facial nevus higher than 10 cm treated in the past 8 years. Our treatment protocol includes serial expander implant to remove everything that does not involve the eyelid and nasal pyramid. Ten patients were included, between 8 and 36 months of age. A median of 4 (2–6) surgeries were conducted, and the number of implanted expanders was 1 to 3 in each session. There were only minor complications in two patients, infection that responded to antibiotic therapy and minimal dehiscence of incision forcing resuturing. The median follow-up was 1.6 (1.3–3.4) years.

Conclusion Tissue expansion has become in recent years the treatment of choice for facial nevus in children, obtaining the best aesthetic result because the defect is covered with similar characteristics in color, texture, and relief skin. It is essential that the reconstruction is done by specialized units and we recommend complete surgical excision before starting school.