Eur J Pediatr Surg
DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1615276
Original Article
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Does Intravenous Acetaminophen Improve Postoperative Pain Control after Laparoscopic Appendectomy for Perforated Appendicitis? A Prospective Randomized Trial

Richard Sola Jr.
Department of Surgery, Children's Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, Kansas City, Missouri, United States
,
Amita A. Desai
Department of Surgery, Children's Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, Kansas City, Missouri, United States
,
Katherine W. Gonzalez
Department of Surgery, Children's Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, Kansas City, Missouri, United States
,
Nichole M. Doyle
Department of Anesthesiology, Children's Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, Kansas City, Missouri, United States
,
Katrina L. Weaver
Department of Surgery, Children's Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, Kansas City, Missouri, United States
,
Ashwini S. Poola
Department of Surgery, Children's Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, Kansas City, Missouri, United States
,
Jason D. Fraser
Department of Surgery, Children's Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, Kansas City, Missouri, United States
,
Shawn D. St Peter
Department of Surgery, Children's Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, Kansas City, Missouri, United States
,
Daniel L. Millspaugh
Department of Anesthesiology, Children's Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, Kansas City, Missouri, United States
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

18 July 2017

14 November 2017

Publication Date:
02 January 2018 (eFirst)

Abstract

Introduction The recent increased awareness of the dangers of opioids in the United States has highlighted the need to minimize narcotics and identify nonopioid options for pain control after surgery. With evidence suggesting that intravenous acetaminophen (IVA) can be an opioid sparing option, we conducted a prospective, randomized trial that evaluated the effect of IVA on the postoperative pain course of children with perforated appendicitis.

Materials and Methods After IRB approval, children with perforated appendicitis were randomized to receive postoperative IVA with the standard patient/nurse-controlled analgesia (PCA) or to receive the PCA alone. All patients were treated according to an evidence-based treatment protocol. The primary outcome was duration of time on PCA.

Results Eighty-two patients were analyzed from 7/14 to 11/15. There was no statistically significant difference in the time to transition from the PCA to oral pain medications for children given IVA compared with children not receiving IVA (76.4 ± 32.5 versus 86.7 ± 49.3 hours; p = 0.73). Children in the IVA group had no statistically significant difference in intravenous narcotics delivered and pain scores compared with the non-IVA group. There was no significant difference in the amount of oral narcotics between both groups (2.8 ± 2.4 versus 2.9 ± 2.5; p = 0.88). Patients who received IVA had higher medication charges ($3752.7 ± 1618.3 vs. $1198.19 ± 521.51; p < 0.01), but not total hospital charges ($53842.0 ± 19409.2 vs. $50501.03 ± 16223.32; p = 0.76).

Conclusion Children given IVA showed no difference in the transition time off the PCA and to oral pain medications after laparoscopic appendectomy for perforated appendicitis.