Eur J Pediatr Surg 2018; 28(01): 101-104
DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1606846
Original Article
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Surgical Emergencies in Intestinal Venous Malformations

Martha Isabel Romo Muñoz
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain
,
Alba Bueno
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain
,
Carlos De La Torre
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain
,
Vanesa Nuñez Cerezo
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain
,
Bryant Noriega Rebolledo
2  Department of Anesthesia, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain
,
Manuel Gomez Cervantes
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain
,
Mariela Dore
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain
,
Javier Jimenez Gomez
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain
,
Manuel Lopez Santamaria
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain
,
Leopoldo Martinez
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain
,
Juan Carlos Lopez-Gutierrez
3  Division of Vascular Anomalies, Pediatric Surgery, La Paz Children's Hospital, Madrid, Spain
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

19 April 2017

14 August 2017

Publication Date:
25 September 2017 (eFirst)

Abstract

Background Venous malformations (VMs) can occur in any part of the body; however, the gastrointestinal tract is a frequent location. These are usually asymptomatic, thus, representing a challenge to diagnosis. Intestinal location of VMs can be associated with severe complications that ultimately require an emergency surgery. Our aim was to analyze all patients with an intestinal VM with special focus on those who required emergency surgery.

Materials and Methods A retrospective study of patients presenting complication caused by intestinal VM was performed. Clinical records, associated anomalies, physical findings, and treatment were assessed.

Results Twenty-one patients had a diagnosis of intestinal VM, 16 (76%) were associated to blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome (BRBNS) and 5 (24%) were isolated. Only four (19%) of the total cases presented an episode of acute abdomen with hemodynamic instability that required an emergency surgery. Findings included two gastrointestinal bleedings, one volvulus, and one intussusception of small bowel. All patients underwent an uneventful recovery and are presently doing well.

Conclusion Intestinal VM can be challenging to diagnose in emergency situations, such as gastrointestinal situation or acute abdomen. The complications associated with it must be kept in mind, regardless of its low incidence.