Am J Perinatol 2017; 34(09): 861-866
DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1599103
Original Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Hemostatic Resuscitation in Peripartum Hysterectomy Pre- and Postmassive Transfusion Protocol Initiation

Eryn H. Dutta
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Naval Hospital Camp Lejeune, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina
,
Aaron T. Poole
2  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Naval Medical Center Portsmouth, Portsmouth, Virginia
,
Faranak Behnia
3  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas
,
Holly E. Dunn
3  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas
,
Shannon M. Clark
3  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas
,
Luis D. Pacheco
3  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas
,
George R. Saade
3  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas
,
Gary D. V. Hankins
3  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

22 April 2016

12 January 2017

Publication Date:
06 March 2017 (eFirst)

Abstract

Background Massive transfusion protocols (MTPs) have been examined in trauma. The exact ratio of packed red blood cells (PRBC) to other blood replacement components in hemostatic resuscitation in obstetrics has not been well defined.

Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate hemostatic resuscitation in peripartum hysterectomy comparing pre- and postinstitution of a MTP.

Study Design We conducted a retrospective, descriptive study of women undergoing peripartum hysterectomies from January 2002 to January 2015 who received ≥ 4 units of PRBC. Individuals were grouped into either a pre-MTP institution group or a post-MTP institution group. The post-MTP group was subdivided into those who had the protocol activated (MTP) versus not activated (no MTP). Primary outcomes were estimated blood loss (EBL) and need for blood product replacement. The secondary outcome was a composite of maternal morbidity, including need for mechanical ventilation, venous thromboembolism, pulmonary edema, acute kidney injury, and postpartum infection. A Mann–Whitney U test was used to compare continuous variables, and a chi-squared test was used for categorical variables with significance of p < 0.05.

Results Of the 165 women who had a peripartum hysterectomy during the study period, 62 received four units or more of PRBC. No significant differences were noted in EBL or blood product replacement between the pre-MTP (n = 39) and post-MTP (n = 23) groups. Similarly, the MTP (n = 6) and no MTP (n = 17) subgroups showed no significant difference between EBL and overall blood product replacement. Significant differences were seen in transfusion of individual blood products, such as fresh frozen plasma (FFP) (MTP = 4, no MTP = 2; p = 0.02) and platelets (plts) (MTP = 6, no MTP = 0; p = 0.03). The use of high ratio replacement therapy for both plasma and plts was more common in the MTP group (FFP/PRBC ratio [MTP = 0.5, no MTP = 0.3; p = 0.02]; plts/PRBC ratio [MTP = 0.7, no MTP = 0; p = 0.03]). There were no differences in the secondary outcome between pre- and post-MTP or MTP and no MTP.

Conclusion Initiation of the MTP did result in an increase in transfusion of FFP and plts intraoperatively. At our institution, the MTP is underutilized, but it appears that providers are more cognizant of the use of high transfusion ratios.

Note

The views expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the Navy, Department of Defense, or the United States Government. Drs. Dutta and Poole are military service members. This work was prepared as part of their official duties. Title 17, USC, §105 provides that “Copyright protection under this title is not available for any work of the U.S. Government.” Title 17, USC, §101 defines a U.S. Government work as a work prepared by a military service member or employee of the U.S. Government as part of that person's official duties.