Synlett 2018; 29(05): 556-559
DOI: 10.1055/s-0036-1591840
letter
© Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York

Synthesis and Characterization of Carboxylic Acids Bearing Poly(ethylene glycol) Chains

Motoi Satou
a  Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8510, Japan   Email: tfuji@scl.kyoto-u.ac.jp   Email: ytsuji@scl.kyoto-u.ac.jp
,
a  Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8510, Japan   Email: tfuji@scl.kyoto-u.ac.jp   Email: ytsuji@scl.kyoto-u.ac.jp
,
Jun Terao
b  Department of Basic Science, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 153-8902, Japan
,
a  Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8510, Japan   Email: tfuji@scl.kyoto-u.ac.jp   Email: ytsuji@scl.kyoto-u.ac.jp
› Author Affiliations
This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number JP16H01020 in Precisely Designed Catalysts with Customized Scaffolding.
Further Information

Publication History

Received: 29 September 2017

Accepted after revision: 30 October 2017

Publication Date:
04 December 2017 (online)

Abstract

Carboxylic acids 1a and 1b bearing three poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chains and carboxylic acid 1c bearing one PEG chain were designed and synthesized. The carboxylic acids 1ac were fully characterized by NMR and ESI-HRMS analyses. In a Pd-catalyzed aerobic oxidation of 1-phenylethanol, 1a and 1b worked well as carboxylate ligands.

Supporting Information

 
  • References and Notes

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