Synlett 2017; 28(10): 1177-1182
DOI: 10.1055/s-0036-1588741
letter
© Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York

Copper Oxide Nanoparticles as a Mild and Efficient Catalyst for N-Arylation of Imidazole and Aniline with Boronic Acids at Room Temperature

Raju Kumar Borah
a  Department of Chemical Sciences, Tezpur University, Napaam, 784028, Assam, India   Email: ashim@tezu.ernet.in
,
Prasanta Kumar Raul
b  Defence Research Laboratory, Post Bag no. 2, Solmara, Tezpur 784001, Assam, India
,
Abhijit Mahanta
a  Department of Chemical Sciences, Tezpur University, Napaam, 784028, Assam, India   Email: ashim@tezu.ernet.in
,
Andrey Shchukarev
c  Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, 90187 Umeå, Sweden
,
Jyri-Pekka Mikkola
c  Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, 90187 Umeå, Sweden
d  Industrial Chemistry & Reaction Engineering, ÅboAkademi University, 20500 Åbo-Turku, Finland
,
Ashim Jyoti Thakur*
a  Department of Chemical Sciences, Tezpur University, Napaam, 784028, Assam, India   Email: ashim@tezu.ernet.in
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Received: 02 February 2017

Accepted after revision: 14 February 2017

Publication Date:
09 March 2017 (online)


Abstract

The present work describes the excellent catalytic activity of copper(II) oxide nanoparticles (NPs) towards N-arylation of aniline and imidazole at room temperature. The copper(II)oxide NPs were synthesized by a thermal refluxing technique and characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy; powder XRD, SEM, EDX, TEM, TGA, XPS, BET surface area analysis, and particle size analysis. The size of the NPs was found to be around 12 nm having a surface area of 164.180 m2 g–1.The catalytic system was also found to be recyclable and could be reused in subsequent catalytic runs without a significant loss of activity.

Supporting Information

 
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