Am J Perinatol 2015; 32(02): 143-148
DOI: 10.1055/s-0034-1376387
Original Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Maternal Glucose Response to Betamethasone Administration

Elizabeth S. Langen
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
,
Jessica L. Kuperstock
2  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts
,
Joyce F. Sung
3  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado
,
Mark Taslimi
4  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Stanford University, Stanford, California
,
James Byrne
5  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Santa Clara Valley Medical Center, San Jose, California
,
Yasser Y. El-Sayed
4  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Stanford University, Stanford, California
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

01 November 2013

03 April 2014

Publication Date:
10 June 2014 (online)

Abstract

Objective This study aims to describe the pattern of maternal glucose response to betamethasone administration using a continuous glucose monitoring system.

Study Design A prospective observational trial was conducted among women receiving clinically indicated betamethasone between 24 and 34 weeks gestation. At the time of initial betamethasone administration, a continuous glucose monitoring device was inserted which measured interstitial fluid glucose levels every 5 minutes. Glucose levels were monitored for 7 days, until delivery, or until hospital discharge, whichever came first. We recorded the percentage of time women spent above three glucose thresholds: 110, 144, and 180 mg/dL, respectively.

Results A total of 17 women were enrolled at the time of betamethasone administration and data were available for 15 patients. There were 11 nondiabetic and 4 diabetic women. Both diabetic and nondiabetic women had the highest recorded blood glucose readings between 24 and 48 hours after the first injection of betamethasone. In that period, nondiabetic women spent 73, 40, and 17% of the time with blood glucose levels above the 110, 144, and 180 mg/dL thresholds, respectively.

Conclusion Nondiabetic women receiving betamethasone manifest significant hyperglycemia after betamethasone administration. If delivery is imminent, maternal glucose response to betamethasone may need to be monitored to prevent possible neonatal hypoglycemia.

Note

Dexcom provided the continuous glucose monitoring devices for this study. In addition, Drs. Sung, Taslimi, and El-Sayed were conducting an investigator initiated, industry-funded prospective trial involving the use of the Dexcom continuous glucose monitoring device in pregnant women. The authors have no other financial relationship with Dexcom. The authors have no other conflicts of interest. This article was presented at: 32nd Annual Meeting of the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, February 6–11, 2012; Dallas, TX.