Eur J Pediatr Surg 2012; 22(03): 260-263
DOI: 10.1055/s-0032-1308708
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Pharyngoesophagoplasty, Posterior Laryngotracheoplasty, and Esophagotracheoplasty for Type III Laryngotracheoesophageal Cleft with a Distal Tracheobronchoesophageal Cleft

Shilpa Sharma
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Dr RML Hospital, New Delhi, India
,
Amita Sen
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Dr RML Hospital, New Delhi, India
,
Arti Maria
2  Department of Pediatrics, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Dr RML Hospital, New Delhi, India
,
Jaswinder Kaur
3  Department of Otolayngology, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Dr RML Hospital, New Delhi, India
,
Ashok Kumar
3  Department of Otolayngology, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Dr RML Hospital, New Delhi, India
,
Rakesh Garg
4  Department of Anaesthesia, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, New Delhi, India
,
Ajay Goila
4  Department of Anaesthesia, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, New Delhi, India
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

17 November 2011

09 January 2012

Publication Date:
10 May 2012 (online)

Introduction

Laryngotracheoesophageal cleft (LTEC) is a rare disorder allied with serious associated anomalies. Benjamin and Inglis classified laryngeal clefts as type 1: supraglottic interarytenoid cleft. Type II: partial cricoid cleft extending below the level of the vocal folds. Type III: total cricoid cleft that may extend to the cervical tracheoesophageal septum. Type IV: laryngoesophageal cleft involving a major part of the tracheoesophageal wall in the thorax.[1] Out of these, the types III and IV are most challenging to diagnose and manage being life-threatening conditions.

An unusual case of type III LTEC and distal tracheobronchoesophageal cleft with an intervening normal oesophageal segment without esophageal atresia that has not been reported is described. A novel staged surgical management adopted for this rare combination is discussed.