Eur J Pediatr Surg 2012; 22(01): 008-012
DOI: 10.1055/s-0032-1306263
Original Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Advanced Necrotizing Enterocolitis Part 1: Mortality

M. Thyoka
1  Department of Surgery, Great Ormond Street Hospital and UCL Institute of Child Health, London, United Kingdom
,
P. de Coppi
1  Department of Surgery, Great Ormond Street Hospital and UCL Institute of Child Health, London, United Kingdom
,
S. Eaton
1  Department of Surgery, Great Ormond Street Hospital and UCL Institute of Child Health, London, United Kingdom
,
K. Khoo
1  Department of Surgery, Great Ormond Street Hospital and UCL Institute of Child Health, London, United Kingdom
,
N. J. Hall
1  Department of Surgery, Great Ormond Street Hospital and UCL Institute of Child Health, London, United Kingdom
,
J. Curry
1  Department of Surgery, Great Ormond Street Hospital and UCL Institute of Child Health, London, United Kingdom
,
E. Kiely
1  Department of Surgery, Great Ormond Street Hospital and UCL Institute of Child Health, London, United Kingdom
,
D. Drake
1  Department of Surgery, Great Ormond Street Hospital and UCL Institute of Child Health, London, United Kingdom
,
K. Cross
1  Department of Surgery, Great Ormond Street Hospital and UCL Institute of Child Health, London, United Kingdom
,
A. Pierro
1  Department of Surgery, Great Ormond Street Hospital and UCL Institute of Child Health, London, United Kingdom
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

15 May 2011

06 December 2011

Publication Date:
20 March 2012 (online)

Abstract

Aim of the Study The aim of this study was to investigate the factors associated with mortality in infants referred for the surgical treatment of advanced necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC).

Methods Retrospective review of all infants with confirmed (Bell stage II or III) NEC treated in our unit during the past 8 years (January 2002 to December 2010). Data for survivors and nonsurvivors were compared using Mann-Whitney test and Fisher's exact test and are reported as median (range).

Results Of the 205 infants with NEC, 35 (17%) were medically managed; 170 (83%) had surgery; 66 (32%) infants died; all had received surgery. Survivors and nonsurvivors were comparable for gestational age, birth weight, and gender distribution. Overall mortality was 32%, the highest mortality was in infants with pan-intestinal disease (86%) but remained significant in those with less severe disease (multifocal 39%; focal disease 21%). The commonest cause of mortality was multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and nearly half of the nonsurvivors had care withdrawn.

Conclusion Despite improvement in neonatal care, overall mortality (32%) for advanced NEC has not changed in 10 years. Mortality is significant even with minimal bowel involvement.