CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · J Neurosci Rural Pract 2014; 05(S 01): S043-S047
DOI: 10.4103/0976-3147.145200
Original Article
Journal of Neurosciences in Rural Practice

A study of Guillain–Barré syndrome with reference to cranial neuropathy and its prognostic implication

Amita Bhargava
Department of Neurology, Dr. Sampurnanand Medical College, Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India
,
Basavaraj F. Banakar
Department of Neurology, Dr. Sampurnanand Medical College, Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India
,
Guruprasad S. Pujar
Department of Neurology, Dr. Sampurnanand Medical College, Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India
,
Shubhakaran Khichar
Department of Neurology, Dr. Sampurnanand Medical College, Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India
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Weitere Informationen

Address for correspondence:

Dr. Basavaraj F. Banakar
Department of Neurology, Mahatma Gandhi Hospital
Jodhpur - 342 001, Rajasthan
India   

Publikationsverlauf

Publikationsdatum:
26. September 2019 (online)

 

ABSTRACT

Background: Focused studies on cranial neuropathy in Guillain–Barrι syndrome (GBS) and its prognostic implication are not done previously. Aim: To study the clinical profile of GBS patients with special reference to cranial neuropathy and its prognostic implication. Materials and Methods: The study included 61 patients with GB syndrome, fulfilling Asbury Cornblath’s criteria for GB syndrome. A pre-designed semi-structured questionnaire was used to obtain data regarding demographic profile and clinical profile. All patients underwent detailed neurological examination, investigations including nerve conduction studies and CSF examination and treated according to the severity of the illness. Patients were followed up for 6 months. During analysis two groups were made depending on cranial nerve involvement, and compared with respect to various parameters. Results: Out of 61 patients 38 (62.3%) patients had cranial nerve palsies, in that 25 had multiple cranial nerve palsies, and 13 had single isolated nerve palsy. A majority of 30 (49.2%) had bulbar palsy, 28 (46%) had facial nerve palsy, and all had bilateral involvement except 3 patients who had unilateral palsy. Hypoglossal nerve involvement was seen in six (10%) patients and four (6.5%) patients had ophthalmoplegia. Only one had bilateral vestibulocochlear nerve palsy. On comparing various clinico-electrophysiological parameters among patients of GB syndrome with and without cranial nerve involvement, the presence of respiratory paralysis, IVIg and ventilatory support requirement had significant association with cranial nerve involvement in GBS. Conclusion: Our study found a correlation between cranial nerve palsies and severity of the illness. Cranial nerve innervated muscles recover earlier as compared to distal limb muscles. No association was found between outcome at 6 months and cranial nerve involvement.


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Conflicts of interest

None declared.


Address for correspondence:

Dr. Basavaraj F. Banakar
Department of Neurology, Mahatma Gandhi Hospital
Jodhpur - 342 001, Rajasthan
India