Endoscopy 2007; 39: E290-E291
DOI: 10.1055/s-2007-966729
Unusual cases and technical notes

© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Spontaneous decapitation of a small colorectal cancer: follow-up of the spontaneous course

Y.  Tomiki1 , H.  Gonda2 , E.  Seki2 , T.  Maeda1 , D.  Kitamura2
  • 1Department of Coloproctological Surgery, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
  • 2Department of Surgery, Ohta General Hospital, Kawasaki, Japan
Further Information

Y. Tomiki, MD

Department of Coloproctological Surgery

Juntendo University School of Medicine

2-1-1 Hongo Bunkyo-ku

Tokyo 113-8421

Japan

Fax: +81-3-3813-0731

Email: tomiki@muh.biglobe.ne.jp

Publication History

Publication Date:
24 October 2007 (online)

Table of Contents

An 80-year-old woman with a history of diabetes and arrhythmia underwent colonoscopy on 28 August 2000, because of a positive fecal occult blood test. An elevated tumor measuring 20 mm was found in the rectum ([Fig. 1 ] a). Biopsy of three different sites revealed well differentiated adenocarcinoma.

Subsequently, on 15 September she suffered a cerebral infarction, which resulted in paralysis of the left side and aphasia. Informed consent to cancel surgery and transfer the patient to a local rehabilitation hospital was obtained from the family.

Colonoscopy was repeated on 5 December 2000 at the bedside, to re-evaluate the state of the tumor before hospital transfer. Endoscopy showed that most of the tumor had dropped off ([Fig. 1 ] b).

On 11 March 2003, a request was received from the hospital to which she had been transferred to investigate a suspected intestinal obstruction. Colonoscopic examination revealed that the partially dislodged tumor remained as a flat lesion ([Fig. 1 ] c). Impaired gastrointestinal transit was due to constipation. Repeat examination was scheduled for 6 months later.

On 11 November 2003, the tumor had increased in volume and redness, and biopsy showed well differentiated adenocarcinoma ([Fig. 1 ] d). The family declined active treatment and the clinical course was observed.

On 22 June 2004, the tumor had developed to a state approaching that observed during the first examination ([Fig. 1 ] e), but the family continued to decline surgery.

On 2 May 2005, the tumor had developed to an invasive ulcerated cancer ([Fig. 1 ] f), and multiple liver metastases were observed on abdominal computed tomography scan.

On 20 November 2005, the patient passed away, 1908 days after initial detection of the tumor.

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Fig. 1 Endoscopic observation of the regrowth of colorectal carcinoma. a On 15 September 2000, an elevated tumor measuring 20 mm was found in the rectum. b On 5 December 2000, most of the tumor had dropped off. c On 11 March 2003, the partially dislodged tumor remained as a flat lesion. d On 11 November 2003, the tumor had increased in volume and redness. e On 22 June 2004, the tumor had developed to a state approaching that observed at the first examination. f On 2 May 2005, the tumor had developed to an invasive ulcerated cancer.

This was a rare case in which the process of regrowth of colorectal carcinoma was followed by endoscopic observation, after the tumor had dropped off due to the mechanical stimulation of biopsy [1].

Endoscopy_UCTN_Code_CCL_1AD_2AB

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References

Y. Tomiki, MD

Department of Coloproctological Surgery

Juntendo University School of Medicine

2-1-1 Hongo Bunkyo-ku

Tokyo 113-8421

Japan

Fax: +81-3-3813-0731

Email: tomiki@muh.biglobe.ne.jp

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References

Y. Tomiki, MD

Department of Coloproctological Surgery

Juntendo University School of Medicine

2-1-1 Hongo Bunkyo-ku

Tokyo 113-8421

Japan

Fax: +81-3-3813-0731

Email: tomiki@muh.biglobe.ne.jp

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Fig. 1 Endoscopic observation of the regrowth of colorectal carcinoma. a On 15 September 2000, an elevated tumor measuring 20 mm was found in the rectum. b On 5 December 2000, most of the tumor had dropped off. c On 11 March 2003, the partially dislodged tumor remained as a flat lesion. d On 11 November 2003, the tumor had increased in volume and redness. e On 22 June 2004, the tumor had developed to a state approaching that observed at the first examination. f On 2 May 2005, the tumor had developed to an invasive ulcerated cancer.