Geburtshilfe Frauenheilkd 2013; 73(3): 247-255
DOI: 10.1055/s-0032-1328318
Review
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Uterine Fibroid Embolisation – Potential Impact on Fertility and Pregnancy Outcome

Myomembolisation – mögliche Auswirkung auf Fertilität und Schwangerschaftsausgang
M. David
1   Klinik für Gynäkologie, Charité Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin, Germany
,
T. Kröncke
2   Klinik für Radiologie, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Correspondence

Prof. Matthias David
Charité Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Klinik für Gynäkologie
Augustenburger Platz 1
13353 Berlin

Publication History

received 17 July 2012
revised 04 February 2013

accepted 04 February 2013

Publication Date:
04 April 2013 (online)

 

Abstract

The current standard therapy to treat myomas in women wishing to have children consists of minimally invasive surgical myomectomy. Uterine artery embolisation (UAE) has also been discussed as another minimally invasive treatment option to treat myomas. This review evaluates the literature of the past 10 years on fibroid embolisation and its impact on fertility and pregnancy. Potential problems associated with UAE such as radiation exposure of the ovaries, impairment of ovarian function and the impact on pregnancy and child birth are discussed in detail. Previously published reports of at least 337 pregnancies after UAE were evaluated. The review concludes that UAE to treat myomas can only be recommended in women with fertility problems due to myomas who refuse surgery or women with an unacceptably high surgical risk, because the evaluated case reports and studies show that UAE significantly increases the risk of spontaneous abortion; there is also evidence of pathologically increased levels for other obstetric outcome parameters. There are still very few prospective studies which provide sufficient evidence for a definitive statement on the impact of UAE therapy on fertility rates and pregnancy outcomes.


#

Zusammenfassung

Aktueller Therapiestandard bei Frauen mit Kinderwunsch zur Behandlung von Myomen ist die möglichst wenig invasive, operative Myomenukleation. Die Uterusarterienembolisation (UAE) zur Myomtherapie wird immer wieder als ebenfalls minimalinvasive Therapiemöglichkeit diskutiert. Die Übersichtsarbeit wertet die Literatur der letzten 10 Jahre zum Thema „Myomembolisation – Einfluss auf Fertilität und Schwangerschaft“ aus, wobei sowohl eine mögliche, mit der Intervention verbundene Strahlenbelastung der Ovarien, mögliche Störungen der Ovarialfunktion infolge der UAE als auch mögliche Auswirkungen auf Schwangerschaft und Geburt auf der Basis der vorliegenden Literatur ausführlich diskutiert werden. Die bisher publizierten mindestens 337 Schwangerschaften nach UAE wurden ausgewertet. Als Reviewergebnis kann die UAE von Myomen nur für Frauen mit myomassoziierten Fertilitätsproblemen empfohlen werden, die chirurgischen Maßnahmen ablehnen oder die ein inakzeptabel hohes chirurgisches Risiko aufweisen, denn vorliegende Fallserien und Studien zeigen, dass eine UAE zumindest das Abortrisiko deutlich erhöht; für weitere geburtshilfliche Outcome-Parameter gibt es Hinweise auf pathologisch erhöhte Werte. Es liegen weiterhin nur wenige prospektive Studien vor, deren Ergebnisse mit der erforderlichen Evidenz eine Aussage über den Einfluss der UAE-Therapie auf Fertilitätsrate und Schwangerschaftsausgang zulassen.


#

Introduction

The current standard therapy to treat myomas in women wishing to have children consists of hysteroscopic, laparoscopic or open abdominal myomectomy; the choice of approach depends on the location, size and number of myomas. Uterine artery embolisation (UAE) has established itself as an alternative procedure to surgical myomectomy or hysterectomy to treat myoma-related symptoms and is even less invasive than laparoscopy. UAE is therefore often suggested as a potential treatment for women of child-bearing age wishing to have children. The benefits and risks of UAE as a treatment option in women of child-bearing age need to be discussed in more detail.

The use of uterine artery embolisation to treat fibroids was first introduced by Ravina at the beginning of the 1990s to treat patients with a very high surgical risk. The technique was then used to treat women with myoma-related symptoms aged more than 35 years who did not wish to have more children [1] More than 200 000 UAE procedures have been carried out worldwide since the end of the 1990s [2], [46], [47]. The data obtained from randomised controlled studies and from clinical experience have shown that UAE is a safe and effective method to treat myomas [3]. Spies et al. (2005) reported a re-intervention rate after myoma embolisation of about 20 % with a follow-up of 5 years [4]. This figure was subsequently confirmed by other long-term studies on UAE (Moss et al. [2010]: 26.4 % [5]; Poulsen et al.: 22 % [6]). The studies also reported complete or partial improvement of symptoms in more than 80 % of patients [6], [7].

There is more uncertainty regarding the use of myoma embolisation in women wishing to have children. In principle, pregnancy after UAE treatment is possible. However, some consensus recommendations expressly reject the use of UAE to treat women intending to have children [8]; some recommendations view the wish to have children as a relative contraindication for UAE [9] or recommend pregnancy only if the patient is closely followed up [10]. On the other hand, there are a number of recent reports of successful pregnancies after UAE (cf. [11], [12]).

This overview focuses on myoma embolisation and its impact on fertility and pregnancy. The benefits and risks of UAE including procedure-related radiation exposure of the ovaries, potential adverse effects on ovarian function as a result of embolisation and the potential impact on pregnancy and birth are discussed here in detail based on the available literature and used to formulate recommendations.


#

Procedure, Therapeutic Success and Side-effects of Uterine Fibroid Embolisation

The indications for myoma embolisation are the same as those for surgical myomectomy procedures: only patients with myoma-related symptoms should be treated. Whether UAE can be an alternative therapy for women with fibroid-related reproductive dysfunction is discussed below.

Procedure: for UAE, the iliac artery is catheterised under fluoroscopic control with injection of a contrast medium for angiographic imaging. The uterine artery is then selectively cannulated and the myomas are devascularised by injecting particles with diameters of 350–900 µm (polyvinyl alcohol particles or tris-acryl gelatin microspheres). This results in hyalinisation with subsequent shrinkage of the fibroids over a period of several months. The aim is to achieve bilateral embolisation. Unilateral UAE may also be done to treat a single myoma, depending on the extent of vascularisation.

[Tables 1] and [2] show the success rates for UAE in patients based on a compilation done by the American Society for Interventional Radiologists (SIR), together with the potential complications and side-effects [9].

Table 1 Objective and subjective outcomes after UAE: compilation of outcomes taken from 15 studies published between 2004 and 2008 (from [9], data given as %).

Reported/published figures

Techn. success after embolisation of both uterine arteries

96

Reduced fibroid size

50–60

Reduced uterine size

40–50

Elimination of hypermenorrhea

> 90

Reduced pressure symptoms

88–92

Elimination of overall symptoms

75

Patient satisfaction

80–90

Table 2 Potential complications after UAE based on a compilation of 15 studies published between 2004 and 2008 (from [9], date given as %).

Reported/published figures

Prolonged vaginal discharge

2–17

Permanent amenorrhea: women

  • > 45 years

20–40

  • < 45 years

0–3

Transcervical expulsion of fibroids

3–15

Septicaemia

< 1

Complications due to “non-target” embolisation

< 1

Deep vein thrombosis/pulmonary embolism

< 1

There are a few studies on the long-term outcomes after UAE; however the follow-up rates are limited. The previously mentioned study of Spies et al. (2005) reported on 200 patients, 87 % of which experienced an improvement of symptoms; after 5 years 73 % still reported an improvement. The re-intervention rate was 20 % (25 hysterectomies, 6 surgical myomectomies, 3 repeat UAE procedures) [4]. Walker and Barton-Smith (2006) followed up 258 women after UAE. 80 % of patients reported an improvement of myoma-related symptoms at 5–7 years after the procedure, while 16 % required re-intervention [13]. In the REST study (n = 106 UAE patients), Moss et al. (2011) reported adverse effects in 19 % of patients and a cumulative re-intervention rate after UAE of 32 % after 5 yearsʼ follow-up [5]. Poulsen et al. (2011) sent a questionnaire to 96 patients 9 years after UAE and had a response rate of 86 %. Of these, 25 % had undergone further treatment; most of them (22 %) had had a hysterectomy [6]. Long-term follow-up of our own patient cohort (n = 62) with a median of 6.6 years after UAE showed a significant improvement of symptoms in 81 % of treated women and an overall improvement in quality of life; the cumulative re-intervention rate (repeat UAE or surgery) was 15.5 % [7].


#

Potential Negative Effect of UAE on Fertility

Radiation exposure

Embolisation is carried out under fluoroscopic control using contrast media for X-ray angiograms, exposing the ovaries to ionising radiation. If the patient wishes to have children it is important that she is informed about the effect and magnitude of the radiation she will be exposed to during the procedure. The median time required for fluoroscopy during UAE is generally less than 20 min; the effective radiation dose is approximately the same as that for two to three computed tomography scans of the abdomen (approx. 12 mSv) [8]. The radiation exposure of the ovaries is around 60–80 mGy. According to the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), the rate of malformations calculated for unfertilised ovules exposed to this radiation dose is one malformation for every 1700 live births, compared to the overall risk for malformations of varying degrees of severity of approx. 30–80 for every 1700 births [14]. In recent years, the embolisation technique for leiomyoma of the uterus has improved significantly. The average fluoroscopy time is between 14 and 16 minutes. The radiation dose can be additionally minimised by the use of pulsed fluoroscopy, no magnification factors, appropriate collimation, etc. Of course, as McLucas et al. (2001) previously emphasised, the radiation dose during UAE depends very much on the experience of the radiologist [15]. Tse and Spies (2010) reviewed current studies, experimental investigations and comparative calculations of radiation exposure during UAE and came to the conclusion, based on these data, that standard UAE procedures do not damage the ovaries or increase the cancer risk [16].


#

Impairment of ovarian function

A serious complication of UAE is the occurrence of permanent amenorrhea, particularly when this is associated with early onset of menopause. This is caused by the unintentional migration of embolisation material through anastomoses between the uterine and ovarian vessels, reducing blood flow to the ovaries. According to a review of the literature by Payne et al. (2002), temporary impairment of ovarian function or complete ovarian failure after UAE occurs in 1–14 % of cases [17]. A recent compilation of 15 studies published between 2004 and 2008 showed an age-dependent rate for permanent amenorrhea of 0–40 % [9] (cf. [Table 2]). Only a few patients had complete cessation of menstrual bleeding due to permanent endometrial atrophy from ischaemia after UAE without impairment of the ovaries [18]. In most cases amenorrhea is caused by cessation of ovarian function. However, this serious side-effect mainly occurs in women older than 45 years with reduced ovarian reserve which makes them more susceptible to an embolic insult [19]. But even in younger patients the indications for UAE need to be weighed very carefully, given this potential side-effect. Tulandi and Salamah (2010) reported an incidence of premature menopause due to impaired ovarian function after uterine artery embolisation of 1–2 % in women younger than 45 [20]. Tropeano et al. recently presented 2 studies on the long-term effect of myoma embolisation on patient hormone status. In a prospective study of a small cohort of patients (n = 36) and long-term follow-up (60 months), they found no significant differences in ovarian size and FSH or E2 levels in women between the ages of 25 and 39 after embolisation compared to a control group [21]. However, there are no studies on AMH, a potentially more important parameter. In a second prospective study with long-term follow-up in another small patient cohort (n = 43, follow-up: 7 years), Tropeano et al. (2011) showed that UAE was not a trigger for premature natural menopause [22].


#
#

Pregnancy and UAE

In the 1990s there were only a few case reports on pregnancy after UAE. However, Ravina et al. had already extended the age limit “downwards” when they treated their first 286 patients; their patients were women with myomas aged between 21 and 53 years. Ravina et al. (2000) reported 11 pregnancies after UAE in this cohort, of which 5 aborted spontaneously [23]. In a first review of the 50 pregnancies reported in the literature worldwide up until 2002, Goldberg et al. already noted certain distinctive features: the rate of premature births was 28 %; malpresentations such as breech presentations occurred in 17 % of cases; 7 % of children were SGA (small for gestational age); the rate of caesarean sections was 58 %; and 13 % of women had increased postpartum bleeding [24]. A number of reports on pregnancies after UAE were published over the next few years (e.g. [25], [26], [27]). In 2006, Marshburn et al. published a review article on the characteristics and problems of pregnancy after UAE [28] ([Table 3]).

Table 3 Pregnancy after UAE: potential problems (compilation from [28]).

* It is unclear whether the cause is the increased age of the UAE patients, the presence of remnants of fibroids or iatrogenic factors.
LBW = low birth weight infant; SGA = small for gestational age

Reduced ovarian perfusion

Premature menopause

Reduced perfusion of the myometrium/endometrium

Problems with implantation and/or risk of spontaneous abortion

Devascularised areas in the myoma

  • structural softening

  • contractile dysfunction

  • risk of rupture (during delivery)

Increased rates of malposition, premature births*, LBW, SGA

Increased rate of caesarean sections*

Placentation disorders

Higher risk for ante- and postpartum bleeding

Increased rate of spontaneous abortions

In their review article (data were obtained from a review of previous articles, numerous case reports and 2 randomised studies) published 2010, Homer and Saridogan considered the question whether UAE to treat fibroids increases the risk of spontaneous abortion. The data of 227 pregnancies occurring after UAE were compared with pooled data obtained from various international publications on pregnancies and births in women with intramural fibroids who had not undergone treatment (control group). No significant differences were found with respect to the number of premature births, foetal malpositions and foetuses with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) between the two investigated cohorts. However, in the UAE group there were significantly more caesarean sections, postpartum bleeding was increased, and the rate of spontaneous abortions was significantly higher [29]. Homer and Saridogan had updated their review by including the results of the case reports of Firouznia et al. (2009) [30], Bonduki et al. (2011) [11] and Pisco et al. (2011) [12] which had not been previously included ([Table 4]). (It should be noted that the review by Goldberg (2004) [31] did not include 4 individual case histories of pregnancies after UAE [26], [32], [33], [34], so the total number of published births and pregnancies carried to term after UAE is currently at least 337.)

Table 4 Overview of published articles on pregnancy outcomes and obstetric complications after fibroid embolisation (as per June 2012; based on [29] and updated).

Main author (year of publication)

No. of patients (n = 333)*

Rate of spontan. abortions (%)

Rate of premature births (%)

Rate of caesarean sections (%)

Percentage non-cephalic presentation (%)

IUGR (%)

Increased postpartum bleeding (%)

* Figures are given as percentages for a better comparison despite the relatively small total numbers.
** Walker et al. continuously publish their data on pregnancies after UAE but do not always include all parameters in their articles.
n/a = not available; IUGR = intrauterine growth restriction

Goldberg (2004)

51

23.5

15.6

62.9

11.4

4.5

5.7

Pron (2005)

22

18.2

22.2

50

5.6

22.2

16.7

Walker (2005)
Walker** (2007)

(50)
62

n/a
34

n/a
11.9

n/a
67.5

9.1
n/a

3.3
n/a

18.2
n/a

Holub (2007)

24

58.3

20

80

20

10

20

Dutton (2007)

34

44.1

n/a

78.9

n/a

n/a

n/a

Mara (2008)

14

64.3

0

60

n/a

0

20

Kim (2008)

9

33.3

0

83.3

n/a.

n/a

n/a

Pabon (2008)

11

27.3

12.5

50

n/a

0

0

Holub (2008)

20

56

20

80

20

n/a

20

Mara (2008)

17

65

0

60

n/a

0

20

Firouznia (2009)

15

13.3

0

100

n/a

0

6.7

Bonduki (2011)

15

13.3

n/a

100

n/a

7.1

0

Pisco (2011)

39

10.2

6.1

66.7

n/a

15.1

0

Cumulative* (mean)

100

33.0

9.8

72.3

13.2

6.2

11.6

Two important aspects will be discussed separately below: the risk of spontaneous abortion and obstetric outcome data after UAE when the pregnancy is carried to term.

Spontaneous abortion risk after UAE

Homer and Saridogan (2010) considered the increased rate of spontaneous abortions after UAE to be the most important finding of their review [29]. An earlier publication by Goldberg (2006) [31] had already noted a clear increase in the rate of spontaneous abortions. The reported rate of 33.0 % was at least twice as high as that reported for a comparison group of untreated women with intramural myomas ([Table 5]).

Table 5 Rate of spontaneous abortions in women after fibroid embolisation and in untreated pregnant women (data of an untreated comparison group of women with myomas according to a compilation of 14 controlled studies, from [29]; historical comparison group II corresponds to the analysis of a large “normal obstetric cohort”, the Danish national birth cohorts 1996–2002, from [44]).

Pregnancies after UAE for fibroids (n = 333)

Comparison group I: untreated cohort with myomas (n = 1 121)

Comparison group II: “normal obstetric cohort” (n = 89 829)

Rate of spontaneous abortions

(118)
33.0 %

(185)
16.5 %

(4 062)
4.5 %

In the literature, the rate of spontaneous abortions reported for women who become pregnant after UAE ranges between 18 % and 65 %. The mean risk of spontaneous abortion after fibroid embolisation is around 33 % and thus around 7 to 8 times higher than that reported for a normal population ([Table 5]). However, at least 2 parameters need to be considered with respect to the post-UAE cohort, both of which negatively affect the spontaneous abortion rate but without it being possible to determine the relative impact: increased maternal age and submucosal location of myomas/myomas which extend far into the uterine cavity. It is not clear whether and when treatment with UAE does not improve the situation – the (temporary) endometrial ischaemia created by the UAE procedure may result in permanent damage to potential implantation locations. Changes in myoma position during myoma degeneration after UAE and changes to the endometrial contours may also be a possible cause of spontaneous abortion [36]. The hysteroscopic examination of 51 women after UAE discussed by Mara et al. (2007) is worth mentioning in this context [37]. Intracavitary fibroid expulsion was noted in 37 % of cases and intracavitary adhesions in 14 %. The uterine cavity was hysteroscopically normal in only 37 % of women after UAE.


#

Obstetric Outcome Data after UAE

Even if no spontaneous abortion occurs in the early stage of pregnancy, the later stages of pregnancy after previous UAE are still considered at risk. Prospective randomised clinical studies are needed to verify this hypothesis. To date, only 2 studies which looked at pregnancy after UAE have been carried out, but only a small number of patients were investigated in both studies. Mara et al. (2008) compared the outcomes of 19 pregnancies after UAE and 33 pregnancies after open abdominal or laparoscopic myoma removal. No differences were found between the two groups with regard to obstetric outcome parameters: obstetric data of 5 births in the UAE cohort were compared to obstetric data of 19 births in the myomectomy cohort (“problem of small numbers”) [38]. Holub et al. (2008) also only had a small comparison group. In a prospective randomised study of patients who underwent myomectomy either by UAE or by bilateral laparoscopic occlusion of the uterine artery they compared pregnancy outcomes in both groups. The UAE group included a total of 20 pregnant patients; the surgery group consisted of 38 women. The obstetric data of 10 women after UAE and of 26 patients after surgery were compared, and not significant differences were found between groups [39].

If the obstetric results of current studies and case series are combined ([Table 4]) and compared to those of an untreated comparison group of women with myomas from 10 controlled studies (selection based on [29]), then the rate of caesarean sections and the incidence of increased postpartum bleeding were significantly increased in the UAE groups compared to untreated women with myomas ([Table 6]).

Table 6 Comparison (data from the untreated control group of women with myomas, compilation of 10 controlled studies, from [29].

Patients after UAE (n = 215)

Control group, untreated cohort with myomas

Normal population (n = 34 711 hospital births*)

* Data for Berlin hospital births from the Land analysis for quality assurance Berlin [45]); ** neonate < 37th week of gestation; *** breech and shoulder presentation; **** singletons; ***** postpartum bleeding > 1 000 ml

Premature birth

9.8 %

16 % (183/1 145)

9.1 %**

Non-cephalic presentation

13.2 %

13 % (466/3 585)

4.8 %***

IUGR

6.2 %

11.7 % (112/961)

k. A.

Caesarean section

72.3 %

48.5 % (2 098/4 322)

25.9 %****

Severe postpartum bleeding

11.6 %

2.5 % (87/3 535)

1.8 %*****

Although it is important to be cautious when interpreting the data (the increased rate of caesarean sections could be due to the request of the pregnant women themselves, the result of an increased need for safety or uncertainty on the part of gynaecologists treating myoma patients after UAE), the rate of caesarean sections, which is almost twice as high, and the fourfold higher rate for increased postpartum bleeding are nevertheless noteworthy.


#
#

Conclusion

For women who intend to have children, the role of UAE as a treatment option has not been sufficiently established yet.

There are currently very few prospective studies [38], [39] with results backed by sufficient evidence to permit a conclusion to be drawn regarding the impact of UAE therapy on fertility and pregnancy outcomes.

For women requiring information/women with myomas wishing to have children, a statement on whether embolisation procedures involve additional reproductive risks or whether UAE could improve fertility is important. Based on our review of the literature, the following recommendations are proposed:

  1. The limited existing evidence shows that operative myomectomy, not UAE, should be the procedure of choice for women requiring treatment for fibroids to improve fertility. This confirms existing consensus recommendations [8], [9], [10].

  2. The case series and studies show that UAE significantly increases the risk of spontaneous abortion. Additional investigations will be needed to understand the causes of the observed increased rates of postpartum bleeding and the increased incidence of caesarean sections in women after myoma embolisation.

  3. Consequently, the use of UAE to treat myomas can only be recommended in women with (presumed) myoma-related fertility problems [40], [41] who strictly refuse surgery or who have a very great or an unacceptably high surgical risk. Patients must be given detailed information on the benefits and risks of the procedure including the impact it may have on their fertility.

Additional studies will be required to follow up the suggestion from various case studies that fibroid embolisation may be associated with increased placentation disorders [11], [42], [43].

Although there are currently no studies which would confirm this recommendation, patients who have received treatment should be told to wait for a period of 6–12 months after UAE, the period of time until the fibroid has changed or shrunk. Women treated with UAE should only attempt to become pregnant after this period has expired.


#

Conflict of Interest

None.


#

Einleitung

Aktueller Therapiestandard bei Frauen mit Kinderwunsch zur Behandlung von Myomen ist je nach Lage, Größe und Zahl die hysteroskopische, laparoskopische oder die offen-abdominale Myomenukleation. Die Uterusarterienembolisation (UAE) hat sich allerdings als ein alternatives Verfahren zur operativen Myomentfernung oder Hysterektomie bei myombedingten Beschwerden etabliert und übertrifft hinsichtlich des minimalinvasiven Vorgehens auch die Laparoskopie. Die UAE wird schon aus diesem Grund von Frauen im reproduktionsfähigen Alter, die schwanger werden wollen, immer wieder als mögliche Therapieoption nachgefragt, sodass sie als Behandlungsmöglichkeit diskutiert werden muss.

Die Uterusarterienembolisation zur Therapie von Myomen wurde Anfang der 1990er-Jahre von Ravina zunächst für solche Patientinnen eingeführt, bei denen ein sehr hohes Operationsrisiko bestand, um dann auf Frauen mit myombedingten Beschwerden, abgeschlossener Familienplanung und einem Alter über 35 Jahren ausgeweitet zu werden [1]. Seit Ende der 1990er-Jahre sind weltweit über 200 000 UAE-Behandlungen durchgeführt worden [2], [46], [47]. Verlaufsdaten nach randomisierten kontrollierten Studien wie auch die klinische Erfahrung haben gezeigt, dass die UAE eine sichere und effektive Methode der Myombehandlung ist [3]. Spies et al. (2005) berichten über eine Re-Interventionsrate nach Myomembolisation in einem 5-Jahres-Nachbeobachungszeitraum von etwa 20 % [4]. Nachfolgend publizierte Langzeitdaten nach UAE haben diese Größenordnung bestätigt (Moss et al. 2010: 26,4 % [5], Poulsen et al.: 22 % [6]) und zeigen auch eine völlige oder teilweise Beschwerdebesserung bei über 80 % der behandelten Patientinnen [6], [7].

Unsicherheit bzw. besonderer Diskussionsbedarf besteht zu Recht immer dann, wenn es um die Myomembolisation bei Frauen mit nicht abgeschlossener Familienplanung geht. Nach einer UAE ist eine Schwangerschaft grundsätzlich möglich. Es liegen allerdings Konsensusempfehlungen vor, die eine UAE bei Frauen mit Kinderwunsch ausdrücklich ablehnen [8], potenziellen Kinderwunsch als relative Kontraindikation ansehen [9] bzw. dies nur im Rahmen von Studien empfehlen [10]; andererseits wird auch aktuell immer wieder über erfolgreich ausgetragene Schwangerschaften nach UAE berichtet (z. B. [11], [12]).

Die nachfolgende Übersicht widmet sich daher dem Thema „Myomembolisation – Einfluss auf Fertilität und Schwangerschaft“, wobei sowohl eine mögliche, mit der Intervention verbundene Strahlenbelastung der Ovarien, denkbare Störungen der Ovarialfunktion infolge der Embolisation als auch mögliche Auswirkungen auf Schwangerschaft und Geburt auf der Basis der vorliegenden Literatur ausführlich diskutiert und abschließend daraus resultierende Empfehlungen gegeben werden.


#

Technische Durchführung, Therapieerfolg und Nebenwirkungen der Myomembolisation

Die Indikationen für die Myomembolisation sind prinzipiell die gleichen wie für eine Operation – nur Patientinnen mit myomassoziierten Beschwerden sollten behandelt werden. Ob für Frauen mit myombedingter Einschränkung der Fertilität die UAE ebenfalls eine Therapieoption darstellen kann, wird nachfolgend diskutiert.

Technisches Vorgehen: Während der UAE wird unter Durchleuchtungskontrolle und mithilfe kontrastmittelunterstützter Angiografie über den transfemoralen Zugang die A. iliaca interna katheterisiert. Dann wird selektiv die A. uterina sondiert und durch die Injektion von ca. 350–900 µm großer Partikel (z. B. Polyvinylalkohol oder Trisacrylgelatine-Mikrospheren) eine Devaskularisation des Myoms bzw. der Myome erreicht. Dies führt zu einer Hyalinisierung und späteren Schrumpfung des Myomgewebes, die über mehrere Monate abläuft. Grundsätzlich wird eine bilaterale Embolisation angestrebt; bei singulären Myomen kann je nach Gefäßversorgung aber auch eine unilaterale UAE erwogen werden.

Die [Tab. 1] und [2] zeigen entsprechend einer Zusammenstellung der US-amerikanischen Gesellschaft der interventionellen Radiologen (SIR) die technische und patientenseitige Erfolgsrate der UAE sowie mögliche Komplikationen und Nebenwirkungen [9].

Tab. 1 Objektive und subjektive Therapieergebnisse nach UAE: Zusammenstellung der Behandlungsresultate aus 15 zwischen 2004 und 2008 publizierten Studien (aus [9], Angaben in %).

berichtete/publizierte Werte

techn. Erfolg nach Embolisation beider Aa. uterinae

96

Myom-Größenreduktion

50–60

Uterus-Größenreduktion

40–50

Eliminierung Hypermenorrhö

> 90

Reduktion Drucksymptomatik

88–92

Symptombeseitigung insgesamt

75

Patientinnenzufriedenheit

80–90

Tab. 2 Mögliche Komplikationen nach UAE – Zusammenstellung aus 15, zwischen 2 004 und 2 008 publizierten Studien (aus [9], Angaben in%).

berichtete/publizierte Werte

prolongierter vaginaler Ausfluss

2–17

permanente Amenorrhö: Frauen

  • > 45 Jahre

20–40

  • < 45 Jahre

0–3

transzervikaler Abgang von Myommaterial

3–15

Septikämie

< 1

Komplikation durch ungezielte („non-target“-)Embolisation

< 1

tiefe Beinvenenthrombose/pulmonaler Embolus

< 1

Zum Langzeitoutcome nach UAE liegen derzeit zwar einige Studien vor, jedoch nur wenige davon mit hohen Follow-up-Raten: Die bereits erwähnte Gruppe um Spies et al. (2005) berichtete über insgesamt 200 Patientinnen, die nach einem Jahr eine Symptomverbesserung von 87 %, nach 5 Jahren noch von 73 % aufwiesen. Die Re-Interventionsrate betrug 20 % (25 Hysterektomien, 6 operative Myomenukleationen, 3 Re-UAE) [4]. Walker und Barton-Smith (2006) verfolgten 258 Frauen nach UAE nach: Bei 80 % der Patientinnen waren nach 5–7 Jahren die myomassoziierten Beschwerden gebessert, 16 % unterzogen sich erneut einer Myomtherapie [13]. Moss et al. (2011) berichten im Rahmen der REST-Studie (n = 106 UAE-Pat.) über das Auftreten unerwünschter Ereignisse bei 19 % der Patientinnen und eine kumulative Re-Interventionsrate nach UAE von 32 % nach 5 Jahren Follow-up [5]. Poulsen et al. (2011) erreichten bei einer Nachbefragung von 96 Patientinnen 9 Jahre nach UAE 86 % der von ihnen behandelten Frauen, 25 % hatten in dieser Zeit eine weitere Behandlung in Anspruch genommen, die meisten (22 %) eine Hysterektomie durchführen lassen [6]. Im eigenen Kollektiv (n = 62) konnte im Langzeitverlauf von im Median 6,6 Jahren nach UAE bei 81 % der behandelten Frauen eine deutliche Beschwerdebesserung und Steigerung der Lebensqualität nachgewiesen werden; die kumulative Re-Interventionsrate für eine erneute UAE oder eine Operation betrug 15,5 % [7].


#

Mögliche negative Auswirkungen der UAE auf die Fertilität

Strahlenbelastung

Die unter Röntgendurchleuchtung und mithilfe kontrastmittelgestützter angiografischer Röntgenaufnahmen durchgeführte Embolisation bringt eine Exposition der Keimdrüsen durch ionisierende Strahlen mit sich. Besonders bei bestehendem Kinderwunsch ist die Patientin über die Wirkung und die Größenordnung der bei dem Eingriff entstehenden Strahlenbelastung zu informieren. Die mittlere Durchleuchtungszeit bei einer UAE sollte unter 20 min liegen; die Strahlenexposition würde hierbei hinsichtlich der effektiven Dosis in der Größenordnung 2 bis 3 Computertomografien des Abdomens liegen (ca. 12 mSv) [8]. Die Strahlenexposition der Keimdrüsen liegt bei ca. 60–80 mGy. Nach Angaben der Internationalen Strahlenschutzkommission (International Commission on Radiological Protection, ICRP) würde sich rein rechnerisch bei dieser Dosis an der unbefruchteten Eizelle eine Rate von einer Fehlbildung auf rund 1700 Geburten ergeben, während spontan ein Risiko von ca. 30–80 Kindern mit einer Fehlbildung verschiedener Schweregrade auf 1700 Geburten besteht [14]. In den letzten Jahren wurde die Technik der Embolisation beim Uterus myomatosus bedeutend optimiert. Die Durchleuchtungszeit liegt durchschnittlich zwischen 14 und 16 Minuten. Es wird eine Minimierung der Strahlendosis durch die Anwendung von gepulster Durchleuchtung, Verzicht auf Vergrößerungsfaktoren, Einfahren von Blenden etc. erreicht. Natürlich ist, wie u. a. McLucas et al. (2001) betonen, die erreichte Strahlendosis während der UAE außerdem stark abhängig von der Erfahrung des durchführenden Radiologen [15]. Tse und Spies (2010) haben aktuell die vorliegenden Studien, experimentellen Untersuchungen und Vergleichsberechnungen zur Frage der Strahlenexposition bei der UAE überprüft und kommen zu dem Schluss, dass sich auf dieser Basis sowohl eine Schädigung der Ovarien als auch eine Erhöhung des Krebsrisikos durch eine Standard-UAE ausschließen lässt [16].


#

Beeinträchtigung der Ovarialfunktion

Als ernste Komplikation nach einer UAE ist das Auftreten einer permanenten Amenorrhö, insbesondere, wenn diese mit einer vorzeitigen Menopause verbunden ist, anzusehen. Diese wird durch die unbeabsichtigte Migration von Embolisationsmaterial über Anastomosen zwischen uterinen und ovariellen Gefäßen verursacht, was zu einer Verminderung des Blutflusses zu den Ovarien führen kann. Mit einer temporären Beeinträchtigung oder dem völligen Versagen der Ovarialfunktion nach UAE ist nach einer Literaturauswertung von Payne et al. (2002) in 1–14 % zu rechnen [17]; eine aktuelle Zusammenstellung aus 15 Studien, die zwischen 2004 und 2008 publiziert wurden, zeigt eine altersabhängige Rate für die permanente Amenorrhö von 0–40 % [9] (siehe [Tab. 2]). Nur bei wenigen Patientinnen ist das völlige Versiegen der Menstruationsblutung einer ischämiebedingten dauerhaften Endometriumatrophie nach UAE geschuldet, ohne dass die Ovarien beeinträchtigt sind [18]. In den meisten Fällen ist die Ursache der Amenorrhö ein Versiegen der Ovarialfunktion. Diese schwere Nebenwirkung kommt allerdings hauptsächlich bei Frauen jenseits des 45. Lebensjahrs vor, da hier offenbar die ovarielle Reserve bereits vermindert ist, sodass sie empfindlicher gegenüber einem embolischen Insult sind [19]. Es bleibt aber zu konstatieren, dass auch bei jüngeren Patientinnen die Indikationsstellung zur UAE im Hinblick auf diese mögliche Nebenwirkung besonders intensiv überdacht werden sollte, denn die Inzidenz der prämaturen Menopause nach Uterusarterienembolisation aufgrund einer Beeinträchtigung der Ovarfunktion beträgt nach Tulandi und Salamah (2010) 1–2 % bei Frauen, die jünger als 45 Jahre sind [20]. Die Arbeitsgruppe um Tropeano hat nun aktuell 2 Studien zum Langzeiteffekt der Myomembolisation auf die hormonelle Situation der Patientinnen vorgelegt. Sie konnte in einer prospektiven Kohortenstudie an einem kleinen Kollektiv (n = 36) im Langzeitverlauf (60 Monate) im Vergleich zu einer Kontrollgruppe keine signifikanten Unterschiede beim Ovarvolumen und bei den FSH- und E2-Werten bei Frauen zwischen 25 und 39 Jahren nach Embolisation feststellen [21]. Untersuchungen mit dem möglicherweise für diese Fragestellung valideren Parameter AMH stehen allerdings noch aus. In einer 2. Studie zeigten Tropeano et al. (2011) in einer prospektiven Studie in einem ebenfalls kleinen Untersuchungskollektiv, dass eine UAE im Langzeitverlauf (n = 43, 7 Jahre Nachbeobachtung) nicht zur vorzeitigen Auslösung der natürlichen Menopause führte [22].


#
#

Schwangerschaft und UAE

In den 1990er-Jahren gab es über Schwangerschaftsverläufe nach einer UAE nur Einzelberichte. Allerdings hatte auch die Gruppe um Ravina bereits bei der Therapie der ersten 286 Patientinnen die Altersgrenze „nach unten“ ausgeweitet, es waren Frauen mit Myomen zwischen 21 und 53 Jahren behandelt worden. Ravina et al. (2000) berichteten dann aus diesem Kollektiv von 11 Schwangeren nach UAE, davon endeten 5 als Abort [23]. Goldberg et al. haben in einem ersten Review der bis 2002 weltweit publizierten 50 Schwangerschaften nach UAE bereits einige Auffälligkeiten festgestellt: Die Frühgeburtsrate betrug 28 %, Lageanomalie wie Beckenendlagen wurden in 17 % beobachtet, SGA-Kinder in 7 %, die Sectio-Frequenz war 58 % und verstärkte postpartale Blutungen wurden in 13 % verzeichnet [24]. Es folgten weitere Publikationen über Schwangerschaften nach UAE in den nächsten Jahren (z. B. [25], [26], [27]). 2006 haben Marshburn et al. die Besonderheiten und Probleme in einem Übersichtsartikel nochmals zusammengestellt [28] ([Tab. 3]).

Tab. 3 Schwangerschaft nach UAE – mögliche Probleme (Zusammenstellung aus [28]).

* Teilw. nicht klar, ob erhöhtes Alter der UAE-Patientinnenklientel, verbliebene geschrumpfte Myomanteile oder iatrogene Faktoren Ursache sind.
LBW = low birth weight infant, Früh- und Neugeborene mit unzureichendem Geburtsgewicht; SGA = small for gestational age, Neugeborene, die zu klein für ihr Gestationsalter sind

Verminderung der Ovardurchblutung

vorzeitige Menopause

Durchblutungsverminderung von Anteilen des Myometrium/Endometrium

Beeinträchtigung der Implantation und/oder Gefährdung des Schwangerschaftsverlaufs

devaskularisierte Areale im Myom

  • strukturelle Erweichung

  • kontraktile Dysfunktion

  • (sub partu) Rupturgefahr

erhöhte Rate von kindlichen Fehllagen, Frühgeburten*, LBW, SGA

erhöhte Sectio-Rate*

Plazentationsstörungen

höheres Risiko ante- und postpartaler Blutungen

erhöhte Abortrate

Homer und Saridogan widmeten sich 2010 in ihrer Übersichtsarbeit (Datenzusammenstellung aus einem Review, zahlreichen Fallserien und 2 randomisierten Studien) der Fragestellung, ob eine UAE bei Myomen das Abortrisiko erhöht. 227 Schwangerschaften nach UAE wurden mit gepoolten Schwangerschafts- und Geburtsdaten unbehandelter Patientinnen mit intramuralen Myomen (Kontrollgruppe), die verschiedenen internationalen Publikationen entnommen wurden, verglichen. Hier zeigten sich keine signifikanten Unterschiede bei den Frühgeburten, kindlichen Fehllagen und IUGR zwischen den beiden Untersuchungskollektiven. In der UAE-Gruppe gab es aber signifikant mehr Sectio-Entbindungen, postpartal verstärkte Blutungen und eine deutlich höhere Abortrate [29]. Die Übersicht von Homer und Saridogan wurde ergänzt und aktualisiert, indem die hier noch nicht enthaltenen Ergebnisse aus den Fallserien-Publikationen von Firouznia et al. (2009) [30], Bonduki et al. (2011) [11] und Pisco et al. (2011) [12] eingefügt wurden ([Tab. 4]). (Es sei darauf verwiesen, dass außerdem im Review von Goldberg [2004] [31] 4 Einzelkasuistiken über Schwangerschaften nach UAE [26], [32], [33], [34] nicht berücksichtigt worden sind, sodass sich damit derzeit eine Gesamtzahl von Publikationen zu ausgetragenen Schwangerschaften bzw. Geburten nach UAE von mindestens 337 ergibt.)

Tab. 4 Übersicht über bisher publizierte Arbeiten zu Schwangerschaftsausgang und Geburtskomplikationen nach Myomembolisation (Stand Juni 2 012; nach [29], ergänzt und aktualisiert).

Hauptautor (Publikationsjahr)

Patientenzahl (n = 333)*

Abortrate (%)

Frühgeburtsrate (%)

Sectio-Rate (%)

Anteil Nichtschädellagen (%)

IUGR (%)

verstärkte postpartale Blutung (%)

* Trotz z. T. relativ kleiner Gesamtzahlen werden zur besseren Übersicht Prozentwerte angegeben.
** Die Gruppe um Walker publiziert kontinuierlich ihre Daten zu Schwangerschaften nach UAE, wobei jeweils nicht alle Parameter in den Artikeln enthalten sind.
k. A.= keine Angabe; IUGR= intrauterine growth restriction, Neugeborene mit intrauteriner Wachstumsverzögerung

Goldberg (2 004)

51

23,5

15,6

62,9

11,4

4,5

5,7

Pron (2 005)

22

18,2

22,2

50

5,6

22,2

16,7

Walker (2 005)
Walker** (2 007)

(50)
62

k. A.
34

k. A.
11,9

k. A.
67,5

9,1
k. A.

3,3
k. A.

18,2
k. A.

Holub (2 007)

24

58,3

20

80

20

10

20

Dutton (2 007)

34

44,1

k. A.

78,9

k. A.

k.A:

k. A.

Mara (2 008)

14

64,3

0

60

k. A.

0

20

Kim (2 008)

9

33,3

0

83,3

k. A.

k. A.

k. A.

Pabon (2 008)

11

27,3

12,5

50

k. A.

0

0

Holub (2 008)

20

56

20

80

20

k. A.

20

Mara (2 008)

17

65

0

60

k. A.

0

20

Firouznia (2 009)

15

13,3

0

100

k. A.

0

6,7

Bonduki (2 011)

15

13,3

k. A.

100

k. A.

7,1

0

Pisco (2 011)

39

10,2

6,1

66,7

k. A.

15,1

0

kumulativ* (Mittelwerte)

100

33,0

9,8

72,3

13,2

6,2

11,6

Auf 2 wichtige Aspekte soll nachfolgend gesondert eingegangen werden: das Abortrisiko und die geburtshilflichen Outcome-Daten nach UAE, wenn es zum Austragen der Schwangerschaft kommt.

Abortrisiko nach UAE

Homer und Saridogan (2010) sehen als wichtigstes Ergebnis ihres Reviews die erhöhte Abortrate nach UAE-Behandlung an [29]. Diese Rate ist auch in Vorpublikationen von Goldberg (2004, 2006) bereits deutlich erhöht [31], [35]. Sie ist mit 33,0 % gut doppelt so hoch wie die einer Vergleichsgruppe von nicht behandelten Patientinnen mit intramuralen Myomen ([Tab. 5]).

Tab. 5 Abortrate bei Frauen nach Myomembolisation und bei Schwangeren ohne Myomtherapie (Daten einer nicht behandelten Vergleichsgruppe von Frauen mit Myomen entspr. einer Zusammenstellung aus 14 kontrollierten Studien, nach [29]; historische Vergleichsgruppe II entspricht Analysen eines großen geburtshilflichen „Normalkollektiv“, den dänischen Nationalen Geburtskohorten 1 996–2 002, nach [44]).

Schwangerschaften nach Myom-UAE (n = 333)

Vergleichsgruppe I: nicht behandeltes Myomkollektiv (n = 1 121)

Vergleichsgruppe II: „geburtshifliches Normalkollektiv“ (n = 89 829)

Abortrate

(118)
33,0 %

(185)
16,5 %

(4.062)
4,5 %

Die berichtete Abortrate bei den Frauen, die nach UAE schwanger werden, schwankt in den Publikationen zwischen minimal 18 und maximal 65 %. Das mittlere Abortrisiko nach Myomembolisation dürfte mit ca. 33 % etwa 7- bis 8-mal höher als in einer Normalpopulation liegen ([Tab. 5]). Mindestens 2 Parameter sind für das Post-UAE-Untersuchungskollektiv allerdings in Betracht zu ziehen, die unabhängig voneinander die Abortrate negativ beeinflussen können, ohne dass hierzu differenzierende Angaben gemacht werden können: erhöhtes mütterliches Alter und submuköse Myomlokalisation bzw. Myome, die breit in das Cavum uteri hineinragen. Unklar ist, ob und wann eine UAE als Myombehandlungsmethode die Situation nicht verbessert – möglicherweise führt die mit der UAE verbundene (temporäre) Endometriumischämie zu permanenten Schädigungungen potenzieller Implantationsorte. Auch Veränderung der Myomlage im Prozess der Myomdegeneration nach UAE und resultierende Veränderungen der Endometriumkontur sind als mögliche Abortursachen denkbar [36]. In diesem Zusammenhang erwähnenswert ist die hysteroskopische Untersuchung von 51 Frauen nach UAE durch Mara et al. (2007) [37]. Die intrakavitäre Ausstoßung von Myommaterial zeigte sich hier in 37 % der Fälle, in 14 % waren intrakavitäre Adhäsionen nachweisbar. Nur bei 37 % der Frauen nach UAE war das Cavum uteri hysteroskopisch normal.


#

Geburtshilfliche Outcome-Daten nach UAE

Auch wenn es nicht bereits zum Abort in der frühen Schwangerschaft gekommen ist, gilt eine Schwangerschaft im weiteren Verlauf nach einer vorausgegangenen UAE als in besonderer Weise gefährdet – um diese Hypothese verifizieren zu können, müssen die Ergebnisse prospektiv-randomisierter klinischer Studien herangezogen werden. Bisher wurden nur 2 solcher Studien, welche die Frage „Schwangerschaft nach UAE“ einbezogen haben, durchgeführt, die allerdings beide nur eine kleine Patientinnenzahl hatten. Mara et al. (2008) verglichen letztlich den Verlauf von 19 Schwangerschaften nach UAE und 33 Schwangerschaften nach offen-abdominal oder laparoskopisch durchgeführter Myomentfernung. Bei den geburtshilflichen Outcome-Parametern fanden sich keine Unterschiede zwischen den beiden Untersuchungsgruppen: Gegenübergestellt wurden die geburtshilflichen Daten von 5 Geburten des UAE- mit 19 Geburten des Myomektomie-Kollektivs („Problem der kleinen Zahl“) [38]. Auf eine ähnlich kleine Vergleichsgruppe konnten auch Holub et al. (2008) nur zurückgreifen. Sie haben im Rahmen einer prospektiven randomisierten Studie bei Patientinnen, deren Myome entweder mittels UAE oder durch einen laparoskopisch durchgeführten beidseitigen Verschluss der A. uterina behandelt wurden, den Schwangerschaftsverlauf verglichen. Die UAE-Gruppe umfasste insgesamt 20 schwangere Patientinnen, die Operationsgruppe 38 Frauen. Die geburtshilflichen Daten von 10 Frauen nach UAE und von 26 Patientinnen nach Operation konnten verglichen werden, wobei sich keine signifikanten Unterschiede fanden [39].

Fasst man die geburtshilflichen Ergebnisse der aktuellen Studien und Fallserien zusammen ([Tab. 4]) und stellt sie einer nicht behandelten Vergleichsgruppe von Frauen mit Myomen aus 10 kontrollierten Studien (Auswahl nach [29]) gegenüber, dann sind die Sectio-Rate und die Frequenz verstärkter postpartaler Blutungen auch in Relation zu diesen Frauen mit Myomen deutlich erhöht ([Tab. 6]).

Tab. 6 Gegenüberstellung (Daten der der nicht-behandelten Kontrollgruppe von Frauen mit Myomen, Zusammenstellung aus 10 kontrollierten Studien, aus [29].

Patientinnen nach UAE (n = 215)

Kontrollgruppe, nicht behandeltes Myomkollektiv

Normalpopulation (n = 34 711 Klinikgeburten*)

* Angaben zu Berliner Klinikgeburten aus der Landesauswertung Qualitätssicherung Berlin [45]); ** Neugeborene < 37. SSW, *** Beckenend- und Querlagen, **** bezogen auf Einlinge, ***** postpartale Blutung > 1 000 ml

Frühgeburtsrate

9,8 %

16 % (183/1 145)

9,1 %**

Nichtschädellage

13,2 %

13 % (466/3 585)

4,8 %***

IUGR

6,2 %

11,7 % (112/961)

k. A.

Sectio-Geburt

72,3 %

48,5 % (2 098/4 322)

25,9 %****

schwere postpartale Blutung

11,6 %

2,5 % (87/3 535)

1,8 %*****

Auch wenn einige Einschränkungen bei einem solchen Vergleich zu bedenken sind und eine vorsichtige Interpretation sicher angebracht ist (z. B. könnten die erhöhte Sectio-Rate auch dem Wunsch der Schwangeren, Sicherheitsbedürfnis oder Unsicherheit der behandelnden Ärzte bei Myompatientinnen nach UAE entspringen), so sind die fast doppelt so hohe Sectio-Rate und die 4-fach erhöhte Rate starker postpartaler Blutungen doch auffällig.


#
#

Schlussfolgerungen

Für Patientinnen mit (potenziellem) Kinderwunsch ist die Rolle der UAE als Behandlungsoption bisher nicht ausreichend geklärt.

Es existieren dazu aktuell nur sehr wenige prospektive Studien [38], [39], deren Ergebnisse nicht mit der erforderlichen Evidenz eine Aussage über den Einfluss der UAE-Therapie auf Fertilitätsrate und Schwangerschaftsausgang zulassen.

Für Informationssuchende/Frauen mit Myomen und Kinderwunsch ist eine Aussage dazu wichtig, ob der Embolisationsprozess zu zusätzlichen reproduktiven Risiken führt oder ob durch die UAE die Fertilität perspektivisch verbessert wird. Daraus ergeben sich folgende Empfehlungen:

  1. Die begrenzte vorliegende Evidenz zeigt, dass die operative Myomentfernung bei den Frauen, bei denen eine Myombehandlung zur Verbesserung der Fertilität notwendig ist, die Methode der Wahl sein sollte und nicht die UAE. Dies bestätigt nochmals die vorliegenden Konsensusempfehlungen [8], [9], [10].

  2. Fallserien und Studien zeigen, dass eine UAE zumindest das Abortrisiko deutlich erhöht. Weitere Untersuchungen müssen die Ursachen der beobachteten erhöhten Raten postpartaler Blutungen und der erhöhten Sectio-Frequenz bei Frauen nach Myomembolisation klären.

  3. Als Konsequenz ergibt sich, dass eine UAE von Myomen nur für Frauen mit (vermuteten) myomassoziierten Fertilitätsproblemen [40], [41] empfohlen werden kann, die chirurgische Maßnahmen strikt ablehnen oder die ein sehr großes bzw. inakzeptabel hohes chirurgisches Risiko aufweisen. Diese Patientinnen sollten ausführlich über die Vorteile und Risiken des Verfahrens inklusive der Auswirkungen auf die zukünftige Fertilität informiert werden.

Wichtig und ebenfalls Gegenstand weiterer wissenschaftlicher Untersuchungen sollten kasuistische Hinweise auf vermehrte Plazentationsstörungen bei Frauen nach Myomembolisation [11], [42], [43] sein.

Den als Ausnahmefall behandelten Patientinnen sollte, ohne dass hierfür bisher beweisende Studien vorliegen, eine „Wartezeit“ von 6–12 Monate nach einer UAE empfohlen werden, die für die resultierende Myomschrumpfung bzw. -strukturveränderungen erforderlich ist. Erst dann kann die Umsetzung des Kinderwunsches versucht werden.


#
#

Interessenkonflikt

Nein.


Correspondence

Prof. Matthias David
Charité Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Klinik für Gynäkologie
Augustenburger Platz 1
13353 Berlin