J Neuroanaesth Crit Care 2015; 02(03): 168-178
DOI: 10.4103/2348-0548.165030
Review Article
Thieme Medical and Scientific Publishers Private Ltd.

Electroencephalography-based monitors

Nidhi Gupta
1  Department of Neuroanaesthesia, Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals, Sarita Vihar and Department of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
,
Gyaninder P Singh
1  Department of Neuroanaesthesia, Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals, Sarita Vihar and Department of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
› Author Affiliations

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Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
02 May 2018 (online)

Abstract

An electroencephalogram (EEG), detects changes and abnormalities in the electrical activity of the brain and thus provides a way to dynamically assess brain function. EEG may be used to diagnose and manage a number of clinical conditions such as epilepsy, convulsive and non-convulsive status epilepticus, encephalitis, barbiturate coma, brain death, etc., EEG provides a large amount of information to the anaesthesiologist for routine clinical practice as depth of anaesthesia monitors and detection of sub-clinical seizures; and also for understanding the complex mechanisms of anaesthesia-induced alteration of consciousness. In the initial years, the routine clinical applicability of EEG was hindered by the complexity of the raw EEG signal. However, with technological advancement, several EEG-derived dimensionless indices have been developed that correlate with the depth of the hypnotic component of anaesthesia and are easy to interpret. Similarly, with the development of quantitative EEG tools, the routine use of continuous EEG is ever expanding in the Intensive Care Units. This review, describe various commonly used EEG-based monitors and their clinical applicability in the field of anaesthesia and critical care.