CC BY 4.0 · Aorta 2016; 04(02): 64-67
DOI: 10.12945/j.aorta.2015.15.022
Case Report
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Anomalous Origin of the Left Vertebral Artery from the Aortic Arch

Evan H. Einstein
1  Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York, USA
,
Linda H. Song
1  Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York, USA
,
Natalia L. A. Villela
1  Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York, USA
,
Gregory B. Fasani-Feldberg
1  Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York, USA
,
Jonathan L. Jacobs
1  Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York, USA
,
Dolly O. Kim
1  Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York, USA
,
Akshay Nathawat
1  Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York, USA
,
Devika Patel
1  Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York, USA
,
Roger B. Bender
1  Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York, USA
,
Daniel F. Peters
1  Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York, USA
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

28 May 2015

04 February 2016

Publication Date:
24 September 2018 (online)

  

Abstract

Anatomic anomalies of the aortic arch have implications for clinical practice if their significance is understood. Our case study involves a cadaveric finding of the left vertebral artery originating directly from the aortic arch. Although this anatomical variation has been documented, the prevalence of this anomaly may be generally underestimated. After noting this anomaly, we analyzed 27 cases and found that four female cadavers had the left vertebral artery originating from the aortic arch rather than the left subclavian artery. With a prevalence rate of 14.8%, it would seem that this anomaly is more significant than previously thought, which could have implications for surgical practice.