Pharmacopsychiatry
DOI: 10.1055/s-0044-100523
Original Paper
© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Prescription of Benzodiazepines and Related Drugs in Patients with Mild Cognitive Deficits and Alzheimer’s Disease

Philipp Hessmann
1  Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Medical Center Goettingen, Germany
2  Center for Health Economics Research Hannover (CHERH), Leibniz University Hannover, Germany
,
Richard Dodel
3  Department of Neurology, Philipps-University Marburg, Germany
4  University Hospital Essen, Geriatric Centre Haus Berge, Contilia GmbH, Germany
,
Erika Baum
5  Department of General Practice, Philipps-University Marburg, Germany
,
Matthias J. Müller
6  Oberberg Clinics Berlin, Germany, and Faculty of Medicine, Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, Germany
,
Greta Paschke
7  Practice for General Medicine, Wiesbaden, Germany
,
Bernhard Kis
1  Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Medical Center Goettingen, Germany
,
Jan Zeidler
2  Center for Health Economics Research Hannover (CHERH), Leibniz University Hannover, Germany
,
Mike Klora
2  Center for Health Economics Research Hannover (CHERH), Leibniz University Hannover, Germany
,
Jens-Peter Reese
8  Coordinating Center for Clinical Trials, Philipps-University Marburg, Germany
,
Monika Balzer-Geldsetzer
3  Department of Neurology, Philipps-University Marburg, Germany
4  University Hospital Essen, Geriatric Centre Haus Berge, Contilia GmbH, Germany
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

received 13 November 2017
revised  17 December 2017

accepted  03 January 2018

Publication Date:
31 January 2018 (eFirst)

Abstract

Introduction Benzodiazepines and related drugs (BZDR) should be avoided in patients with cognitive impairment. We evaluated the relationship between a BZDR treatment and the health status of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD).

Methods Cross-sectional study in 395 AD patients using bivariate and multiple logistic analyses to assess correlations between the prescription of BZDR and patients’ characteristics (cognitive and functional capacity, health-related quality of life (HrQoL), neuropsychiatric symptoms).

Results BZDR were used in 12.4% (n=49) of all participants. In bivariate analyses, the prescription was associated with a lower HrQoL, a higher need of care, and the presence of anxiety. Multivariate models revealed a higher risk of BZDR treatment in patients with depression (OR 3.85, 95% CI: 1.45 – 10.27). Community-dwelling participants and those treated by neurologists/psychiatrists had a lower risk of receiving BZDR (OR 0.33, 95% CI: 0.12 – 0.89 and OR 0.16, 95% CI: 0.07 – 0.36).

Discussion The inappropriate use of BZDR conflicts with national and international guidelines. We suggest evaluating indications and treatment duration and improving the knowledge of alternative therapies in healthcare institutions.