Exp Clin Endocrinol Diabetes 2018; 126(05): 309-315
DOI: 10.1055/s-0043-119877
Article
© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Gender Differences in Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Metabolically Healthy Normal Weight Adults with Central Obesity

Katarína Šebeková
1   Institute of Molecular BioMedicine, Faculty of Medicine, Comenius University, Bratislava, Slovakia
,
Melinda Csongová
1   Institute of Molecular BioMedicine, Faculty of Medicine, Comenius University, Bratislava, Slovakia
,
Radana Gurecká
1   Institute of Molecular BioMedicine, Faculty of Medicine, Comenius University, Bratislava, Slovakia
2   Institute of Medical Physics, Biophysics, Informatics and Telemedicine, Faculty of Medicine, Comenius University, Bratislava, Slovakia
,
Zora Krivošíková
3   Department of Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Slovak Medical University, Bratislava, Slovakia
,
Jozef Šebek
4   Institute of Materials & Machine Mechanics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava, Slovakia
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

received 02 August 2017
first decision 11 September 2017

accepted 18 September 2017

Publication Date:
08 November 2017 (online)

Abstract

We investigated whether metabolically healthy normal weight adults with central obesity display worse cardiometabolic profile compared with their centrally lean counterparts. This retrospective, cross-sectional study, comprised 1 135 subjects (64% females) aged 18-to-81 years, presenting ≤2 components of metabolic syndrome. They were classified as centrally lean (waist-to-height ratio (WHtR)<0.5 and waist circumference<80 cm in females and<94 cm in males) or presenting central obesity (WHtR ≥0.5, regardless of waist circumference). Data on blood pressure, glucose homeostasis, lipid profile, renal function, high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP), uric acid, adiponectin, leptin, and soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products were compared between the groups, separately in males and females. 5.7% of males and 6.9% of females presented WHtR ≥0.5. Compared with centrally lean subjects, those with central obesity had higher BMI-adjusted fasting plasma glucose (p<0.001), and leptin levels (p<0.05); females also presented higher blood pressure (p<0.001), while males had higher hsCRP concentrations (p=0.021). These changes associated with significantly higher BMI-adjusted odds to present fasting plasma glucose >5.6 mmol/l in both genders, higher odds to present hsCRP >3 mg/l in males, and those to present elevated blood pressure in females. Our analysis suggests that in metabolically healthy normal weight subjects WHtR ≥0.5 might indicate “early increased health risk”.

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