Endoscopy 2016; 48(06): 557-562
DOI: 10.1055/s-0042-102251
Original article
© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

In vivo real-time assessment of colorectal polyp histology using an optical biopsy forceps system based on laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

Timo Rath
1  Department of Medicine I, Division of Gastroenterology, Pneumology and Endocrinology, University Hospital Erlangen, Germany
,
Gian E. Tontini
1  Department of Medicine I, Division of Gastroenterology, Pneumology and Endocrinology, University Hospital Erlangen, Germany
,
Michael Vieth
2  Institute of Pathology, Klinikum Bayreuth, Germany
,
Andreas Nägel
1  Department of Medicine I, Division of Gastroenterology, Pneumology and Endocrinology, University Hospital Erlangen, Germany
,
Markus F. Neurath
1  Department of Medicine I, Division of Gastroenterology, Pneumology and Endocrinology, University Hospital Erlangen, Germany
,
Helmut Neumann
1  Department of Medicine I, Division of Gastroenterology, Pneumology and Endocrinology, University Hospital Erlangen, Germany
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

submitted 04 August 2015

accepted after revision 07 December 2015

Publication Date:
23 March 2016 (online)

Background and study aims: In order to reduce time, costs, and risks associated with resection of diminutive colorectal polyps, the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) recently proposed performance thresholds that new technologies should meet for the accurate real-time assessment of histology of colorectal polyps. In this study, we prospectively assessed whether laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS), using the new WavSTAT4 optical biopsy system, can meet the ASGE criteria.

Patients and methods: 27 patients undergoing screening or surveillance colonoscopy were included. The histology of 137 diminutive colorectal polyps was predicted in real time using LIFS and findings were compared with the results of conventional histopathological examination. The accuracy of predicting polyp histology with WavSTAT4 was assessed according to the ASGE criteria.

Results: The overall accuracy of LIFS using WavSTAT4 for predicting polyp histology was 84.7 % with sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive value (NPV) of 81.8 %, 85.2 %, and 96.1 %. When only distal colorectal diminutive polyps were considered, the NPV for excluding adenomatous histology increased to 100 % (accuracy 82.4 %, sensitivity 100 %, specificity 80.6 %). On-site, LIFS correctly predicted the recommended surveillance intervals with an accuracy of 88.9 % (24/27 patients) when compared with histology-based United States guideline recommendations; in the 3 patients for whom LIFS- and histopathology-based recommended surveillance intervals differed, LIFS predicted shorter surveillance intervals.

Conclusions: From the data of this pilot study, LIFS using the WavSTAT4 system appears accurate enough to allow distal colorectal polyps to be left in place and nearly reaches the threshold to “resect and discard” them without pathologic assessment. WavSTAT4 therefore has the potential to reduce costs and risks associated with the removal of diminutive colorectal polyps.