Facial Plast Surg
DOI: 10.1055/s-0041-1727248
Original Article

Distraction Osteogenesis: Mandible and Maxilla

Rami P. Dibbs
1  Division of Plastic Surgery, Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas
2  Division of Plastic Surgery, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas
,
Andrew M. Ferry
1  Division of Plastic Surgery, Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas
2  Division of Plastic Surgery, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas
,
Shayan M. Sarrami
1  Division of Plastic Surgery, Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas
2  Division of Plastic Surgery, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas
,
Amjed Abu-Ghname
1  Division of Plastic Surgery, Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas
,
Robert F. Dempsey
1  Division of Plastic Surgery, Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas
2  Division of Plastic Surgery, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas
,
Edward P. Buchanan
1  Division of Plastic Surgery, Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas
2  Division of Plastic Surgery, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas
› Author Affiliations

Abstract

Mandibular and maxillary deformities commonly require surgical intervention. Prior to distraction osteogenesis, traditional modalities involving single-staged translocation and rigid fixation were used to correct these craniofacial anomalies. Distraction osteogenesis has evolved as a compelling alternative for treating aesthetic and functional dentofacial defects. The process of distraction osteogenesis involves three phases—latency, activation, and consolidation—which allow for appropriate translation of the affected craniofacial skeleton. This review will cover the role of distraction for managing congenital and acquired deformities of the mandible and maxilla. This novel technique can be performed at numerous anatomical sites along the craniofacial skeleton to treat a variety of anomalies, which serves as a testament to its adaptability and efficacy. Importantly, distraction osteogenesis also has the ability to simultaneously increase bone length and the overlying soft tissue envelope. This advantage results in larger advancements with reduced relapse rates and improved patient satisfaction. While complications remain a concern, it stands to reason that the measurable benefits observed underscore the power and versatility of distraction osteogenesis.



Publication History

Publication Date:
03 May 2021 (online)

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