Methods Inf Med 2020; 59(01): 041-047
DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1710380
Patient Rehabilitation Techniques

Design of a Low-Cost, Wearable Device for Kinematic Analysis in Physical Therapy Settings

Andrew Hua
1  Department of Kinesiology and Community Health, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, United States
,
Nicole Johnson
2  Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, Illinois, United States
,
Joshua Quinton
3  Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, Illinois, United States
,
Pratik Chaudhary
4  Department of Computer Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, Illinois, United States
,
David Buchner
1  Department of Kinesiology and Community Health, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, United States
,
Manuel E. Hernandez
1  Department of Kinesiology and Community Health, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, United States
› Author Affiliations
Funding Andrew Hua was supported in part by the Medical Scholars Program at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign by a Patricia J. and Charles C.C. O'Morchoe Fellowship in Leadership Skills Awards and a Graduate Fellowship.

Abstract

Background Unsupervised home exercise is a major component of physical therapy (PT). This study proposes an inexpensive, inertial measurement unit-based wearable device to capture kinematic data to facilitate exercise. However, conveying and interpreting kinematic data to non-experts poses a challenge due to the complexity and background knowledge required that most patients lack.

Objectives The objectives of this study were to identify key user interface and user experience features that would likely improve device adoption and assess participant receptiveness toward the device.

Methods Fifty participants were recruited to perform nine upper extremity exercises while wearing the device. Prior to exercise, participants completed an orientation of the device, which included examples of software graphics with exercise data. Surveys that measured receptiveness toward the device, software graphics, and ergonomics were given before and after exercise.

Results Participants were highly receptive to the device with 90% of the participants likely to use the device during PT. Participants understood how the simple kinematic data could be used to aid exercise, but the data could be difficult to comprehend with more complex movements. Devices should incorporate wireless sensors and emphasize ease of wear.

Conclusion Device-guided home physical rehabilitation can allow for individualized treatment protocols and improve exercise self-efficacy through kinematic analysis. Future studies should implement clinical testing to evaluate the impact a wearable device can have on rehabilitation outcomes.

Supplementary Material



Publication History

Received: 30 October 2019

Accepted: 02 March 2020

Publication Date:
14 June 2020 (online)

© 2020. Thieme. All rights reserved.

Georg Thieme Verlag KG
Stuttgart · New York