Thorac Cardiovasc Surg
DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1710002
Original Cardiovascular
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Risk Factors for Mortality in Acute Aortic Dissection Type A: A Centre Experience Over 15 Years

Mohamed Salem
1  Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein Campus Kiel, Kiel, Germany
,
1  Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein Campus Kiel, Kiel, Germany
,
Alexander Thiem
1  Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein Campus Kiel, Kiel, Germany
,
Katharina Huenges
1  Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein Campus Kiel, Kiel, Germany
,
Thomas Puehler
1  Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein Campus Kiel, Kiel, Germany
,
Jochen Cremer
1  Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein Campus Kiel, Kiel, Germany
,
Assad Haneya
1  Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein Campus Kiel, Kiel, Germany
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

02 September 2019

04 March 2020

Publication Date:
19 June 2020 (online)

Abstract

Introduction Acute aortic dissection Type A (AADA) is still associated with a high mortality rate and frequent postoperative complications. This study was designed to evaluate the risk factors for mortality in AADA patients.

Patients and Methods This retrospective analysis included 344 consecutive patients who underwent surgery for AADA in moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest (20–24°C nasopharyngeal) between 2001 and 2016.

Results The 30-day mortality rate was 18%. Nonsurvivors were significantly older (65.7 ± 12.0 years vs. 62.0 ± 12.5 years; p = 0.034) with significantly higher Euro-score II [15.4% (6.6; 23.0) vs. 4.63% (2.78; 9.88); p < 0.001)]. Intraoperatively, survivors had statistically shorter cardiopulmonary bypass times [163 (134; 206) vs. 198 min (150; 245); p = 0.001]. However, the hypothermic circulatory arrest time was similar between both groups. Postoperatively, the incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) (55.9 vs. 15.2%; p < 0.001), stroke (27.9 vs. 12.1%; p = 0.002) and sepsis (18.0 vs. 2.1%; p < 0.001) were significantly higher among nonsurvivors. The multi-variable logistic regression confirmed that older age, previous cardiac surgery, preoperative cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), blood transfusion and postoperative acute kidney injury (AKI) were independent risk factors for mortality.

Conclusion Our analysis suggested that the reason for mortality was multifactorial, especially age, previous cardiac surgery, CPR, transfusion, as well as postoperative AKI were considered risk factors for mortality.