Am J Perinatol 2020; 37(08): 857-860
DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1709687
Short Communication
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

In-Hospital Telehealth Supports Care for Neonatal Patients in Strict Isolation

Rachel A. Umoren
1  Department of Pediatrics, Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washington
2  Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
,
Megan M. Gray
1  Department of Pediatrics, Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washington
2  Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
,
Sarah Handley
1  Department of Pediatrics, Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washington
2  Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
,
Nathaniel Johnson
1  Department of Pediatrics, Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washington
,
Christina Kunimura
1  Department of Pediatrics, Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washington
3  Digital Health Innovation, Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washington
,
Ulrike Mietzsch
1  Department of Pediatrics, Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washington
2  Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
,
Zeenia Billimoria
1  Department of Pediatrics, Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washington
2  Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
,
Mark D. Lo
1  Department of Pediatrics, Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washington
2  Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

28 March 2020

01 April 2020

Publication Date:
08 April 2020 (online)

Abstract

The aim of this study is to determine the feasibility of “in-hospital” inpatient telemedicine within a children's referral hospital to facilitate inpatient care activities such as interprofessional rounding and the provision of supportive services such as lactation consultations to pediatric patients in strict isolation. To test the feasibility of in-hospital video telemedicine, a dedicated telemedicine device was set up in the patient's room. This device and the accompanying Bluetooth stethoscope were used by the health care team located just outside the room for inpatient rounding and consultations from supportive services. Video telemedicine facilitated inpatient care and interactions with support services, reducing the number of health care providers with potential exposure to infection and decreasing personal protective equipment use. In the setting of strict isolation for highly infectious viral illness, telemedicine can be used for inpatient care activities such as interprofessional rounding and provision of supportive services.

Key Points

  • Telehealth supports patient care in isolation.

  • Telehealth reduced health care provider exposures.

  • Telehealth conserves personal protective equipment.

Authors' Contributions

R.A.U. had full access to all the data in the study and takes responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis. C.K. provided administrative, technical, or material support. R.A.U. dedicated in statistical analysis and carried out study supervision. All authors have made substantial contributions to study concept and design; acquisition, analysis, or interpretation of data; drafting of the manuscript; and critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content.