J reconstr Microsurg
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1693408
Original Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Analysis of the Microsurgery Match from 2014 to 2018 Reveals Increased Competition for Microsurgery Fellowship Positions

Michael N. Cooper
1  Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
2  Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana
,
Giulia Daneshgaran
1  Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
3  Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York
,
Roy Yu
1  Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
,
Jeff Chang
1  Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
,
Emma Vartanian
1  Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
,
Meghana Shamsunder
4  Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York
,
Babak J. Mehrara
4  Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York
,
Evan M. Matros
4  Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York
,
Alex K. Wong
1  Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

21 March 2019

28 May 2019

Publication Date:
14 July 2019 (eFirst)

Abstract

Background There has been no peer-reviewed published data analyzing the microsurgery match since it was established. The aim of this study is to present and analyze match data to inform residents and programs regarding outcomes.

Methods Anonymized data were requested from the San Francisco Match, which was plotted and analyzed utilizing Pearson's Chi-square, unpaired t-test, and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA).

Results Match data was obtained from the years 2014 to 2018. The match rate decreased from 84.6% in 2015 to 67.3% in 2018, mean = 73.7 (8.29%), and (p = 0.01735). The position fill rate fluctuated from 82.9% in 2014 to 90.0% in 2016, mean = 86.5 (3.0%). In 2014 and 2015, 66.7% of applicants matched their first or second choice compared to 48.0% in 2018, mean = 58.7 (8.3%), (p =.04785). Matched applicants ranked mean = 6.6 (1.4%) programs versus 3.4 (1.3) for unmatched, (p < 0.0001). Filled programs ranked a greater number of applicants per position, mean = 8.5 (1.8%), compared to partially filled, mean = 4.6 (2.6%), and unfilled mean = 3.6 (3.4%), programs (p = 0.0014). In 2015, 55.0% of programs matched their first or second choice compared to 30.4% of programs in 2018, mean = 43.0 (10.1%).

Conclusion The application process for microsurgery has become more competitive. Matched applicants rank more programs than do unmatched. Fully filled programs rank more applicants per position than do unfilled or partially filled. Applicants and programs are increasingly less likely to match their top choices.

Authors Contribution

(1) M.N.C. is the principal author of this study, performing data abstraction, analysis, drafting, writing, editing, figure creation, and assembly of the manuscript.


(2) G.D. assisted in the drafting, writing, editing, and figure creation.


(3) R.Y. assisted in writing, editing, figure creation, and provided statistical analyses.


(4) J.C. assisted in writing, editing, and reviewing.


(5) E.V. assisted in writing, reviewing, and figure creation.


(6) E.M.M. assisted in drafting, writing, editing, and statistical analyses.


(7) B.J.M. assisted in conceptualizing, drafting, and editing.


(8) M.S. provided statistical analysis.


(9) A.K.W. is the corresponding author and conceptualized the study, and assisted in drafting, writing, editing, and reviewing.