CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · J Morphol Sci 2019; 36(04): 223-230
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1693021
Original Article
Thieme Revinter Publicações Ltda Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Gastrointestinal Tract and Accessory Organs in the Spotted Bent-toed Gecko, Cyrtodactylus peguensis (Boulenger, 1893): A Histological and Histochemical Study

Lamai Thongboon
1  Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla, Thailand
,
Sinlapachai Senarat
2  Department of Marine Science, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand
,
Jes Kettratad
2  Department of Marine Science, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand
,
Wannee Jiraungkoorskul
3  Department of Pathobiology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand
,
Sansareeya Wangkulangkul
1  Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla, Thailand
,
Pisit Poolprasert
4  Program of Biology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Pibulsongkram Rajabhat University, Phitsanulok, Thailand
,
Chamnan Para
5  Department of Western Languages and Linguistics, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Mahasarakham University, Thailand
,
Gen Kaneko
6  School of Arts and Sciences, University of Houston – Victoria, Texas, United States
,
Theerakamol Pengsaku
7  Faculty of Medical Technology, Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla, Thailand
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

27 April 2019

01 May 2019

Publication Date:
08 August 2019 (online)

  

Abstract

The spotted bent-toed gecko Cyrtodactylus peguensis is one of the exploited reptiles in Thailand. In order to provide basic information for the digestive system of this species, we have examined histologically the gastrointestinal and accessory organs of C. peguensis using routine methods. The gastrointestinal region of this reptile started from the stomach and the intestine. The stomach was separated into fundic and pyloric regions. In both regions, the stomach wall was formed by four distinct tissue layers, including mucosa, submucosa, muscularis, and serosa layers. Mucous neck cells and oxynticopeptic cells were identified as glycoprotein-producing cells in the stomach by Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining. The small and large intestines shared many histological characteristics, but the former contained more intestinal folds, while the latter had more PAS-positive goblet cells. Histological characteristics of accessory organs, liver and pancreas, were also provided. Overall, the gastrointestinal and accessory organs of C. peguensis were largely similar to those from other reptiles, but fine structural information will open up considerable opportunities to further studies related to the endocrinology, the physiology, and the conservation of this species.