Am J Perinatol 2019; 36(S 02): S63-S67
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1691803
Review Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Recent Trends in RSV Immunoprophylaxis: Clinical Implications for the Infant

Santiago Acero-Bedoya
1  Center for Vaccines and Immunity, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, Ohio
,
Phillip S. Wozniak
2  Center for Perinatal Research, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, Ohio
,
Pablo J. Sánchez
2  Center for Perinatal Research, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, Ohio
3  Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Nationwide Children's Hospital, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, Ohio
4  Division of Infectious Diseases, Nationwide Children's Hospital, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, Ohio
,
Octavio Ramilo
1  Center for Vaccines and Immunity, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, Ohio
4  Division of Infectious Diseases, Nationwide Children's Hospital, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, Ohio
,
Asuncion Mejias
1  Center for Vaccines and Immunity, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, Ohio
4  Division of Infectious Diseases, Nationwide Children's Hospital, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, Ohio
5  Departamento de Farmacologia y Pediatria, Facultad de Medicina de Malaga, Universidad de Malaga (UMA), Spain
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
25 June 2019 (online)

Abstract

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) remains the leading cause for hospitalizations in infants worldwide, resulting in significant health and financial burden. Since 1998, the humanized monoclonal antibody palivizumab remains the only available option licensed for the prevention of severe RSV disease in high-risk children, namely premature infants and those with chronic lung disease and congenital heart disease. In 2014, the American Academy of Pediatrics modified the recommendations on the use of RSV prophylaxis in these high-risk children, and limited its use to premature infants born at < 28 weeks' gestational age (wGA). Following this last guidance update, studies have confirmed that premature infants of 29 to 34 wGA remain at high risk for severe RSV disease, especially those of younger chronologic age. New and more cost-effective strategies are being developed that would help alleviate both the health and financial burden associated with severe RSV disease.