CC BY 4.0 · ACI Open 2019; 03(01): e13-e17
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1684003
Original Article
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Evaluation of RFID Technology to Capture Surgeon Arrival Time to Meet American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma Verification Guidelines

Heather Lyu
1  Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
2  Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
,
Nicholas Faoro
3  Division of Trauma, Burn, Surgical Critical Care, and Emergency General Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
,
Meghan McDonald
3  Division of Trauma, Burn, Surgical Critical Care, and Emergency General Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
,
Molly Jarman
4  Center for Surgery and Public Health, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
,
Kevin Kreitzman
5  Clinical Engineering, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
,
Ali Salim
1  Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
2  Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
3  Division of Trauma, Burn, Surgical Critical Care, and Emergency General Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
,
Adam Landman
2  Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
6  Department of Emergency Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
› Author Affiliations
Funding Dr. Lyu was supported by the National Library of Medicine Institutional training grant for research training in biomedical informatics and data science (T15) under award number T15LM007092.
Further Information

Publication History

05 September 2018

10 January 2019

Publication Date:
27 March 2019 (online)

Abstract

Background The presence of an attending surgeon at all highest-level trauma activations is a requirement for American College of Surgeons-Committee on Trauma (ACS-COT) verification for level I to III trauma centers. Programs must demonstrate compliance with this criterion at least 80% of the time. Documentation of compliance can increase administrative burden presenting an opportunity for automation.

Objectives The aim of this quality improvement project was to compare surgeon arrival documentation rates obtained utilizing radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology with manual documentation.

Methods This project was conducted at a single level-I trauma center. RFID badges were distributed to all trauma surgeons. Arrival times for surgeons using manual nursing documentation and RFID activation were collected from October 2017 through March 2018. Presence of appropriate documentation and attending arrival within 15 minutes of trauma activation were compared by documentation method: nursing manual documentation or RFID system.

Results There were 98 code trauma activations included in the analysis over the 6-month period. Nursing documentation of trauma surgeon attendance occurred 83% of the time (n = 81), with 81% (n = 79) in compliance within 15 minutes of code trauma activation. RFID badges were activated 91% (n = 89) of the time, with 86% (n = 84) in compliance within 15 minutes. There was no statistically significant difference between the rates of nursing documentation and RFID badge activation.

Conclusion RFID technology is a reliable, complementary method of documenting compliance for trauma surgeon attendance. Trauma centers searching for technological solutions to address compliance with ACS-COT guidelines and to reduce administrative burden may consider the use of RFID technology.

Protection of Human and Animal Subjects

This study did not involve any human subjects. Data were collected as part of a quality improvement project and did not require review by the institutional review board.