J reconstr Microsurg
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1683447
Letter to the Editor
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Gender Comparison of Medical Student Microsurgical Skills in a Laboratory Model

Tsan-Shiun Lin
1  Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taiwan
,
Rowena Sudario-Lumague
1  Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taiwan
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

20 January 2019

10 February 2019

Publication Date:
14 March 2019 (eFirst)

It is with great appreciation that we consider the suggestions pointed out by the reader in our microsurgical training article among medical students.

Regarding the first comment, it is assumed that the medical students had no previous training in microsurgery but a questionnaire would have confirmed these assumptions and further given us an idea of the factors that could have affected their performance. All students were given the same amount of time to practice but only the performance after training was assessed. This testing at only one point in time does not indicate how male and female genders could learn skills differently. Further improvement in the research design could include a pre-test. Indeed, the correlation of certain nonsurgical skills (playing video games) in the performance of surgery should be considered.

The second comment regarding assessment done at only one time point by a single surgeon is pointed out in the article as one of the limitations of the study. It is further pointed out that the use of a video motion analysis software (ProAnalyst) could have made our study more objective but was limited by its high cost. We still believe that the data we have gathered in 13 years more or less give us a valid assessment of the surgical skills of our students that is similar for both genders.