J Neurol Surg B 2019; 80(06): 593-598
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1676982
Original Article
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Transorbital Approach for Improved Access in the Management of Paranasal Sinus Mucoceles

Craig Miller
1  Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States
,
Angelique Berens
1  Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States
,
Sapna A. Patel
2  Surgery Service, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Seattle, Washington, United States
3  Larrabee Center for Facial Plastic Surgery, Seattle, Washington, United States
,
Ian M. Humphreys
1  Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States
,
Kris S. Moe
1  Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States
4  Department of Neurosurgery, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States
› Author Affiliations
Funding Source National Institutes of Health (NIH) T32 Institutional Ruth L. Kirschstein Service Award T32DC000018 (PI: Edward Weaver).
Further Information

Publication History

12 August 2018

13 November 2018

Publication Date:
08 January 2019 (online)

Abstract

Introduction Paranasal sinus mucoceles result from obstruction of mucous glands resulting in a cystic fluid collection that expands and encroaches upon surrounding structures. Transnasal endoscopic marsupialization has largely replaced open resection. However, mucoceles located in the orbital region or the lateral frontal sinus continue to be difficult to approach via the transnasal approach alone and often require additional approaches, such as the frontal trephine. This study sought to investigate the feasibility of the transorbital technique as an adjunct to traditional transnasal approaches in the management of paranasal sinus mucoceles.

Methods A retrospective case series of paranasal sinus mucoceles approached with a transorbital technique from a tertiary care center.

Results From 2008 to 2016, 17 patients were treated with a transorbital approach for 20 mucoceles. Of note, 24% of the patients in our series had undergone previous surgical management of the mucocele (nontransorbital approach), representing revision cases. Most mucoceles involved the frontal sinus (82%). The total complication rate was 6%. We observed no new or worsened diplopia, ptosis, or permanent visual loss. Recurrence rate was 6%.

Conclusions The endoscopic transorbital approach is a feasible complement to transnasal approaches for treatment of mucoceles located in technically challenging locations. We have demonstrated that transorbital approaches can be performed with no resultant orbital damage, visual change, ptosis, or permanent diplopia. While most patients can be treated with a standard transnasal approach, the transorbital approach can be used as part of a multiportal strategy for those with difficult to access mucoceles. Future prospective studies are needed to further characterize patient selection and outcomes.