J Knee Surg 2020; 33(01): 062-066
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1676516
Original Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Bipolar Sealers Do not Improve Blood Loss or Functional Outcomes of Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty

Stefano Pasqualotto
1  Department of Knee Surgery, Lyon-Ortho-Clinic, Lyon, France
,
Guillaume Demey
1  Department of Knee Surgery, Lyon-Ortho-Clinic, Lyon, France
,
Aude Michelet
2  Department of Research and Development, ReSurg SA, Nyon, Switzerland
,
Luca Nover
2  Department of Research and Development, ReSurg SA, Nyon, Switzerland
,
Mo Saffarini
2  Department of Research and Development, ReSurg SA, Nyon, Switzerland
,
David Dejour
1  Department of Knee Surgery, Lyon-Ortho-Clinic, Lyon, France
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

13 July 2018

28 October 2018

Publication Date:
21 December 2018 (online)

Abstract

Several methods were introduced to limit perioperative blood loss in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). By transcollation of soft tissues below 100°C, bipolar sealers intend to reduce bleeding and tissue damage, compared with conventional electrocautery. Existing studies report contradictory findings about the performance of bipolar sealers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a bipolar sealer on blood loss, transfusions, hospital length of stay (LOS), and functional scores in primary TKA. In this single-center prospective study, 101 patients, undergoing primary TKA in a fast-track setting without tourniquet use, were randomly assigned to either (1) the study group which was operated with a bipolar sealer or (2) the control group operated with conventional electrocautery. The study cohort comprised 49 men and 52 women, aged 71.1 ± 8.8 years. There was no significant difference between the bipolar sealer group and the control group in terms of blood loss at day 3 (1,240 ± 547.4 vs. 1,376 ± 584.4 mL; p = ns [not significant]), transfusion rate (10 vs. 4%; p = ns), surgery time (48.2 ± 10.8 vs. 46.6 ± 9.1 minute; p = ns) or LOS (4.1 ± 2.7 vs 4.3 ± 2.0 days; p = ns). At a mean follow-up of 63.3 ± 4.9 days, there was no significant difference between the bipolar sealer group and the control group in terms of net improvement of Knee Society Score (KSS) knee (26.0 ± 16.7 vs. 23.7 ± 12.3; p = ns) and KSS function (20.4 ± 19.3 vs. 20.8 ± 19.9; p = ns). Compared with the use of conventional electrocautery in primary TKA without tourniquet, we found no effect of bipolar sealer use on blood loss, transfusion rates, LOS, or functional recovery. This is a Level II, prospective cohort study.