J Knee Surg 2020; 33(01): 078-083
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1676462
Original Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

The Effects of Resection Technique on Implant Migration in Single Radius Posterior-Stabilized Total Knee Replacement

Matthew G. Teeter
1  Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, London Health Sciences Centre University Hospital, London, Ontario, Canada
,
Kevin Perry
2  Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota
,
Xunhua Yuan
3  Department of Imaging, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario, Canada
,
James L. Howard
1  Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, London Health Sciences Centre University Hospital, London, Ontario, Canada
,
Brent A. Lanting
1  Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, London Health Sciences Centre University Hospital, London, Ontario, Canada
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

04 April 2018

28 October 2018

Publication Date:
18 December 2018 (online)

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to measure the effects of gap balancing and resection techniques on migration of a single total knee replacement implant design. A total of 23 patients (24 knees) were recruited on referral to either a surgeon performing gap balancing or a surgeon performing measured resection and followed prospectively. All patients received a fixed bearing, posterior stabilized total knee replacement implant of a single radius femoral component design with cement fixation, and all aspects of care outside of resection technique were identical. Patients underwent radiostereometric analysis (RSA) at 2 weeks (baseline), 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years. Migration of the tibial and femoral components was compared between groups. Tibial component migration was greater at 2 years in the gap balancing group (mean difference = 0.336 mm, p = 0.036), but there was no difference at 1 year. One measured resection and three gap balancing tibial components demonstrated continuous migration > 0.2 mm between years 1 and 2. There was no difference in femoral component migration. Small differences in tibial component migration were found between the gap balancing and measured resection techniques. However, comparing the migration to established predictive thresholds for long-term loosening risk, implants performed with both techniques were found to have equally low revision risk.