Appl Clin Inform 2018; 09(04): 809-816
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1675371
Research Article
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

An Electronic Medical Record in Pediatric Medical Education: Survey of Medical Students' Expectations and Experiences

Daryl R. Cheng
1  EMR Team, The Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne, Parkville, Australia
2  Department of General Medicine, The Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne, Parkville, Australia
3  Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, University of Melbourne, Carlton, Australia
,
Thomas Scodellaro
1  EMR Team, The Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne, Parkville, Australia
,
Wonie Uahwatanasakul
2  Department of General Medicine, The Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne, Parkville, Australia
3  Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, University of Melbourne, Carlton, Australia
,
Mike South
1  EMR Team, The Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne, Parkville, Australia
2  Department of General Medicine, The Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne, Parkville, Australia
3  Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, University of Melbourne, Carlton, Australia
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

18 April 2018

18 September 2018

Publication Date:
07 November 2018 (online)

Abstract

Objective This study sought to quantitatively characterize medical students' expectations and experiences of an electronic health record (EHR) system in a hospital setting, and to examine perceived and actual impacts on learning.

Methods Medical students from July to December 2016 at a tertiary pediatric institution completed pre- and postrotation surveys evaluating their expectations and experience of using an EHR during a pediatric medicine rotation. Survey data included past technology experience, EHR accessibility, use of learning resources, and effect on learning outcomes and patient–clinician communication.

Results Students generally reported high computer self-efficacy (4.16 ± 0.752, mean ± standard deviation), were comfortable with learning new software (4.08 ± 0.771), and expected the EHR to enhance their overall learning (4.074 ± 0.722). Students anticipated the EHR to be easy to learn, use, and operate, which was consistent with their experience (pre 3.86 vs. post 3.90, p = 0.56). Students did not expect nor experience that the EHR reduced their interaction, visual contact, or ability to build rapport with patients. The EHR did not meet expectations to facilitate learning around medication prescribing, placing orders, and utilizing online resources. Students found that the EHR marginally improved feedback surrounding clinical contributions to patient care from clinicians, although not to the expected levels (pre 3.50 vs. post 3.17, p < 0.01).

Conclusion Medical students readily engaged with the EHR, recognized several advantages in clinical practice, and did not consider their ability to interact with patients was impaired. There was widespread consensus that the EHR enhanced their learning and clinician's feedback, but not to the degree they had expected.

Protection of Human and Animal Subjects

This study was performed in compliance with the World Medical Association Declaration of Helsinki on Ethical Principles for Medical Research Involving Human Subjects and was reviewed by RCH Human Research Ethics Committee (39196A).


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