CC BY 4.0 · Aorta 2018; 06(02): 068-069
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1669416
Images in Aortic Disease
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Aortic Aneurysm Eroding into the Spine

T. Konrad Rajab
1  Division of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
,
Miriam W. Beyene
2  Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts
,
Farhang Yazdchi
1  Division of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
,
Matthew T. Menard
1  Division of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
› Author Affiliations
Funding None
Further Information

Publication History

12 May 2017

12 June 2018

Publication Date:
25 January 2019 (online)

  

Abstract

Aortic aneurysms are usually asymptomatic until catastrophic rupture occurs. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms classically present with acute back pain, shock, and a pulsatile abdominal mass. The natural history of some aortic aneurysms also includes a stage of contained rupture. This occurs when extravasation of blood from the ruptured aneurysm is contained by surrounding tissues. Here, the authors report the case of a chronic contained abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture that resulted in erosion of the spine.