Dig Dis Interv 2017; 01(S 04): S1-S20
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1641649
Poster Presentations
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA

Left-sided Portal Hypertension

Lisa Walker
1  Department of Radiology, Center for Interventional Radiology, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio
,
Teodora Bochnakova
1  Department of Radiology, Center for Interventional Radiology, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio
,
Divya Kumari
1  Department of Radiology, Center for Interventional Radiology, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio
,
Indravadan Patel
1  Department of Radiology, Center for Interventional Radiology, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio
,
Sidhartha Tavri
1  Department of Radiology, Center for Interventional Radiology, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
22 March 2018 (online)

 

Introduction Left-sided portal hypertension (LSPH) is an uncommon entity, accounting for <5% of all patients with portal hypertension. LSPH should be considered in patients with esophagogastric bleeding and splenomegaly with normal liver function tests. LSPH is most commonly asymptomatic; however, clinically, a majority of symptomatic cases first present with acute massive or chronic upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding from ruptured varices. This exhibit will discuss the incidence, etiology, clinical presentation, and examples of outcomes of LSPH.

Content Organization

  1. Discuss prevalence and causes of LSPH

  2. Clinical presentation

  3. Pathophysiology of LSPH: with and without splenic vein thrombosis

  4. Different interventional radiology treatment options: splenic artery embolization, balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO), and transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS)

  5. Institutional experience with case presentation

Learning Points LSPH is an uncommon entity, which can occur in the presence or absence of splenic vein thrombosis. These are typically asymptomatic, however can present with catastrophic UGI bleeding from ruptured varices. Multi-disciplinary involvement is required for optimal management.