Vet Comp Orthop Traumatol 2018; 31(04): 229-238
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1639579
Original Research
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Comparison of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy and Silver-Coated Foam Dressings in Open Wound Treatment in Dogs: A Prospective Controlled Clinical Trial

Mirja C. Nolff*
Department for Clinical Veterinary Medicine, Clinic for Small Animal Surgery and Reproduction, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich, Bayern, Germany
,
Rebecca Albert*
Department for Clinical Veterinary Medicine, Clinic for Small Animal Surgery and Reproduction, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich, Bayern, Germany
,
Sven Reese
Department for Basic Veterinary Sciences, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich, Bayern, Germany
,
Andrea Meyer-Lindenberg
Department for Clinical Veterinary Medicine, Clinic for Small Animal Surgery and Reproduction, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich, Bayern, Germany
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

06 March 2017

14 February 2018

Publication Date:
11 June 2018 (eFirst)

Abstract

Objectives To evaluate negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) for treatment of complicated wounds in dogs.

Study Type Prospective randomized clinical study

Materials and Methods Dogs (n = 26) undergoing open-wound treatment were randomly assigned to one of two groups: Group A (n = 13) NPWT; Group B (n = 13) silver-coated foam dressing. Pairs of patients were matched based on wound conformation, localization, and underlying cause and compared in terms of duration of previous treatment, development of wound size (wound planimetry), time to closure, bacterial bio-burden and complications. Wound dressing changes were performed every 3 days during the first 9 days of therapy for both groups. Statistical analysis was performed.

Results Pre-treatment signalment and bacterial status were comparable between groups. Total time to closure was significantly (p = 0.018) shorter in Group A (14.2 days) compared with Group B (28.6 days), and wound planimetry on days 3, 6 and 9 showed significant greater reduction in total wound area for Group A at all-time points (p < 0.05). Furthermore, wounds in Group A showed less progression of local infection than did wounds in Group B (p = 0.01).

Conclusion NPWT-treated wounds showed faster closure, improved macro-deformation and less local signs of infection.

Author contributions

Mirja C. Nolff contributed to the conception of the study, study design, acquisition of data, and data analysis and interpretation. Rebecca Albert contributed to acquisition of data, and data analysis and interpretation. Sven Reese contributed to the conception of the study, and data analysis and interpretation. Andrea Meyer-Lindenberg contributed to study design, and data analysis and interpretation. All authors drafted and revised and approved the submitted manuscript.


* Both authors contributed equally to the completion of the manuscript.


Supplementary Material