Am J Perinatol 2018; 35(10): 940-945
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1629899
Original Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Programmatic and Administrative Barriers to High-Risk Infant Follow-Up Care

Brian G. Tang
1  Department of Pediatrics (Developmental and Behavioral), Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Los Altos, California
2  Department of Pediatrics (Neonatal and Developmental Medicine), Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California
,
Henry C. Lee
2  Department of Pediatrics (Neonatal and Developmental Medicine), Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California
3  California Perinatal Quality Care Collaborative, Stanford, California
,
Erika E. Gray
2  Department of Pediatrics (Neonatal and Developmental Medicine), Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California
3  California Perinatal Quality Care Collaborative, Stanford, California
,
Jeffrey B. Gould
2  Department of Pediatrics (Neonatal and Developmental Medicine), Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California
3  California Perinatal Quality Care Collaborative, Stanford, California
,
Susan R. Hintz
2  Department of Pediatrics (Neonatal and Developmental Medicine), Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California
3  California Perinatal Quality Care Collaborative, Stanford, California
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

11 December 2017

08 January 2018

Publication Date:
13 February 2018 (online)

Abstract

Objective This article characterizes programmatic features of a population-based network of high-risk infant follow-up programs and identifies potential challenges associated with attendance from the providers' perspective.

Study Design A web-based survey of high-risk infant follow-up program directors, coordinators, and providers of a statewide high-risk infant follow-up system. Frequencies and percentages were used to describe the survey responses.

Results Of the 68 high-risk infant follow-up programs in California, 56 (82%) responded to the survey. The first visit no-show rate between 10 and 30% was estimated by 44% of programs with higher no-show rates for subsequent visits. Common strategies to remind families of appointments were phone calls and mailings. Most programs (54%) did not have a strategy to help families who lived distant to the high-risk infant follow-up clinic.

Conclusion High-risk infant follow-up programs may lack resources and effective strategies to enhance follow-up, particularly for those living at a distance.