Am J Perinatol 2018; 35(10): 946-950
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1626706
Original Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Relationship between Blood Glucose Fluctuation and Brain Damage in the Hypoglycemia Neonates

Yuan Lv
1  Department of Neonatology, Northern Jiangsu People's Hospital, Yangzhou, China
,
Ling-Ling Zhu
1  Department of Neonatology, Northern Jiangsu People's Hospital, Yangzhou, China
,
Gui-Hua Shu
1  Department of Neonatology, Northern Jiangsu People's Hospital, Yangzhou, China
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

29 November 2017

20 December 2017

Publication Date:
14 February 2018 (online)

Abstract

Objective To investigate the relationship between blood glucose fluctuation and brain damage in the hypoglycemia neonates.

Study Design A retrospective study including all neonates hospitalized due to hypoglycemia from September 2013 to August 2016 was performed. All the 58 hypoglycemia infants were divided into two groups—the brain-damaged group and the nonbrain-damaged group, according to head magnetic resonance imaging and/or amplitude-integrated electroencephalogram. Relationship between glucose variability and brain damage and whether these variation indexes could act as early indicators for hypoglycemic brain damage were investigated.

Results Of the 13 brain-damaged cases, the lowest blood glucose (LBG) level was lower, while duration of hypoglycemia was longer compared with the 45 nonbrain-damaged cases (p < 0.001). The largest amplitude of glycemic excursions, standard deviation of blood glucose, and mean amplitude of glycemic excursions (MAGE) of the brain-damaged group were higher (p < 0.001). Under receiver-operating characteristic curve, values of area under the curve of MAGE were 0.892, duration of hypoglycemia was 0.921, and LBG was 0.109 (p < 0.0001).

Conclusion Brain damage of the hypoglycemia neonates relates not only with LBG and duration of hypoglycemia but also with the blood glucose variation indexes; MAGE and duration of hypoglycemia could act as predictors for brain damage.