Am J Perinatol 2017; 34(09): 918-921
DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1600917
Original Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA

Variations in Infant CYP2B6 Genotype Associated with the Need for Pharmacological Treatment for Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome in Infants of Methadone-Maintained Opioid-Dependent Mothers

Helen Mactier
1  Neonatal Unit, Princess Royal Maternity, Glasgow, United Kingdom
,
Poppy McLaughlin
2  Department of Anthropology and Forensic Science, Bournemouth University, Fern Barrow, Poole, United Kingdom
,
Cheryl Gillis
1  Neonatal Unit, Princess Royal Maternity, Glasgow, United Kingdom
,
Michael David Osselton
2  Department of Anthropology and Forensic Science, Bournemouth University, Fern Barrow, Poole, United Kingdom
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

23 October 2016

09 February 2017

Publication Date:
20 March 2017 (eFirst)

Abstract

Background Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) in infants of methadone-maintained opioid-dependent (MMOD) mothers cannot be predicted in individual cases. We investigated whether variation in infant genotype is associated with severity of NAS.

Methods This is a pilot observational cohort study of 21 MMOD mothers and their newborns. Infant buccal swabs were obtained soon after delivery, together with a maternal blood sample for the determination of maternal plasma methadone concentration. Genomic variation in five opioid-related genes (ABCB1, COMT, CYP2B6, CYP2D6, and OPRM1) was ascertained from infant buccal swabs and related to need for pharmacological treatment of NAS.

Results Out of 21 infants, 11 (52%) required treatment for NAS. Mothers of treated infants tended to have been prescribed higher doses of methadone, but plasma methadone concentrations did not differ between mothers of treated or untreated babies. Treated and untreated babies did not differ in terms of method of feeding. Treated infants were more likely to carry the normal (homozygous) allele at 516 and 785 regions of CYP2B6 gene (p = 0.015 and 0.023, respectively). There were no differences in any other genes between infants who did or did not require treatment for NAS.

Conclusion Genomic variation in CYP2B6 may explain, at least in part, severity of NAS.

Note

This study was undertaken as part of a PhD cosponsored by Bournemouth University and Randox. Royal Bournemouth Hospital donated the space for sample analysis.